Skip to:Main Content

Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee University
Washington and Lee University Campus Image

Implanon

Background

Implanon is a progestin hormone-containing rod that is inserted under the skin of a woman's arm. It works primarily by preventing ovulation, but also works by thickening the cervical mucus and altering the lining of the uterus. Implanon provides contraception for at least 3 years and can be removed at any time.

Advantages

  • Provides long-term protection against pregnancy
  • Highly effective and easy to use (no daily pill to remember)
  • No interruption of sex
  • Contains no estrogen (estrogen is sometimes associated with higher risk of blood clots)

Disadvantages

  • May experience unscheduled and irregular bleeding, especially during early months of use
  • Needs to be inserted by a health care provider
  • Offers no protection against STIs

Efficacy

Failure rate is .05%

Availability

Contact the Student Health Center or your health care provider.

Additional Information

Implanon should not be used by women experiencing unexplained abnormal vaginal bleeding, or by breastfeeding women less than 6 weeks after birth. Additionally, women with active hepatitis, current breast cancer, or a current blood clot should not use this method of contraception.  After Implanon removal, most users return to fertility within 6 weeks.