Skip to:Main Content

Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee University

Young Donors Make Giving a Priority

from The Bridge: Fall 2010 issue

"We are most likely to rely on those relationships now, and I consider giving to W&L similar to paying the dues of a local bar association or other professional organization. It's one more way to connect and engage, and as its most recent graduates, W&L needs our participation and feedback to make the Law School experience richer for future classes."
-Mary Godwin Menge '08L

 

Chris Fetzer '10L pictured with Lindsay Brown '10LChris Fetzer '10L, plus Colin Ram, Radcliff Menge and Mary Godwin Menge, all members of the Law Class of 2008, have made support of the School of Law a habit. Though they are in the early stages of their law careers, all made generous contributions to their third-year class gift projects. In August, for example, Fetzer joined a Washington legislative-law firm as a senior associate. He's already slated a portion of his paycheck to begin fulfilling his class-project pledge, because he wants to demonstrate his long-term commitment as a law alumnus.

"For more than 150 years, the W&L School of Law has produced attorneys highly respected for their capability and integrity by their peer practitioners," said Fetzer. "As the Law School transitions to a new leadership regime over the course of the next year-plus, I felt obligated to contribute to the resources from which the school must draw to continue to attract bright, motivated students and maintain a dynamic and comfortable learning environment for them."

Colin Ram '08Ram, an attorney with the Washington office of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, counts not only his W&L education but also his friendships and his experience on the Law Review and as class representative to the Executive Committee as highlights of his experience. It's an experience he wants to support for those who follow.

"I believe that as students, we benefited greatly from the financial support of generations of alumni who came before us," he added. "As an alumnus, I feel it is my responsibility to help continue that strong tradition of support so that future W&L students can have access to the great resources and experiences that each of us benefited from during our time in Lexington."

The Menges feel the same way. They met at W&L and married a year after graduation. "Giving is just one way to foster a relationship with the Law School and alumni," said Mary.

"We are most likely to rely on those relationships now, and I consider giving to W&L similar to paying the dues of a local bar association or other professional organization. It's one more way to connect and engage, and as its most recent graduates, W&L needs our participation and feedback to make the Law School experience richer for future classes."

The Menges, both associates at New York City law firms, were drawn to the Law School by its honor system, the enthusiasm of alumni and the beauty of Lexington. They also treasure their relationships with professors.

"You really can't put a price tag on W&L's alumni network," said Mary. "I constantly encounter both law and undergraduate alums who are excited and willing to help a fellow grad. I think the enthusiasm stems from the shared experience of W&L traditions, and it is my hope that our support helps W&L to preserve the culture that produces such loyal graduates."