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Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee University

Competitive Scholarships, Awards and Prizes

The following competitive scholarships and awards are conferred annually by the faculty on the basis of the cumulative grade-point averages of the students eligible:

The Robert Alexander Scholarship
The George Addison Baxter Scholarship
The Henry Ruffner Scholarship

These three scholarships, established by the Board of Trustees in honor of the first principal of Augusta Academy and two presidents of Washington College, are awarded annually by the faculty on a competitive basis, the student's record for the previous two years being taken into consideration. The general conditions for holding these scholarships are the same as those laid down for endowed scholarships.

The Luther Seevers Birely Scholarship was given by Mrs. Evelina H. Birely of Baltimore, as a memorial to her son. It is conferred upon a student living in Virginia, West Virginia, or Maryland, preference being given to a resident of Frederick County, Virginia, or Frederick County, Maryland.

The Vincent L. Bradford Scholarship, endowed by Mrs. Juliet S. Bradford of Philadelphia, in memory of her husband, is conferred upon an undergraduate. The student's record during the previous two years here is taken into account.

The James D. Davidson Memorial Fund Scholarship was established under the will of Mrs. Clara D. Estill in memory of her father.

The Franklin Society Scholarship is conferred on a student living in Rockbridge County, Virginia. The award is based on the student's record during the previous two years here.

The James McDowell Scholarship, endowed by Mrs. Mary B. Ross in memory of her father, James McDowell, former Governor of Virginia, is conferred upon an undergraduate. The award is based on the student's record during the previous two years here.

The Mapleson Award, given by J. H. Mapleson of New York, is conferred upon the Bachelor of Arts graduate of this University who obtains the highest record.

The Robinson Awards were established in compliance with the will of John Robinson, a generous benefactor of this institution. They are:

A. The Robinson Award in Languages. This award is conferred on the student attaining the highest grades in ancient and modern languages, provided he offers 48 semester hours in these subjects, including one major.

B. The Robinson Award in Mathematics and Science. This award is conferred on the student attaining the highest grades in mathematics and natural science, provided he or she offers 60 semester hours in these subjects, including one major.

C. The Robinson Award in English Literature, History and Social Sciences. This award is conferred on the student attaining the highest grades in subjects other than those mentioned in (A) or (B) above, provided he offers 60 semester hours in such subjects, including one major.

The selections for the Robinson Awards are made on a competitive basis and are for excellence of work and extent of work in a particular field of study. The combined grades shall have an index rating of not less than three and a half and no grade shall be below B. Only members of the graduating class are eligible.

The following competitive scholarships are awarded annually by the faculty, upon recommendation of the individual departments, for excellence of performance in particular fields of study:

The Catherine Houston Campbell Scholarship in English Literature was established by Leslie Lyle Campbell, M.A. 1887, in memory of his wife. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of English to a student in the University, from Rockbridge County, Virginia, or the Valley of Virginia.

Departmental Scholarships. The faculty confers one scholarship, based on excellence of performance, in each of the following departments: Accounting, Biology, Economics, English, Geology, German and Russian, History, Journalism, Latin, Management, Physical Education, Physics, Politics, Psychology, Religion, and Romance Languages (French and Spanish) The scholarships in Economics, English, French, History, and Politics are awarded from funds established under the Elizabeth B. Garrett scholarships.

Each of these scholarships entitles the recipient to take any courses in the University, except in the School of Law, with a deduction from the regular fees.

The Elizabeth B. Garrett Scholarships were founded on a bequest made by Mrs. Elizabeth B. White in 1918. This fund provides for five of the department scholarships, namely one each in the following departments: Economics, English, French, History and Politics.

The John H. Hamilton Scholarship in Greek was established by Mrs. Virginia Catherine Hamilton in memory of her son, a devoted alumnus.

The Lena T. Stevens Scholarship in Geology was established in 1956 by an alumnus in recognition of Mrs. Stevens' interest in and aid to geological education. It is awarded annually upon the recommendation of the head of the Department of Geology to a junior or senior who is majoring in geology.

The Walter LeConte Stevens Scholarship, given by Mrs. Stevens in memory of her husband, long a professor of the University. Preference is given to a student who has made an outstanding record in the Department of Physics and Engineering.

The Taylor Scholarship, endowed by Mrs. Fannie B. Taylor of Baltimore, is conferred upon a junior mathematics major who, in the judgment of the faculty of the Mathematics Department, has excelled in a junior level mathematics sequence.

The Martin Baldwin Whitaker Memorial Scholarship was established in 1981 by the family of Martin Baldwin Whitaker and by his former law firm, Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White, Johnson and Williams of Houston, Texas. The annual award is to be made to a rising senior, majoring in history, who has achieved the highest grade-point average in history courses. Mr. Whitaker was a member of the Class of 1971.

The James J. White Scholarship is conferred for high attainments in the advanced course in Greek.

The Mary Louisa Reid White Scholarship, established by Mrs. William George Brown (nee Isabelle White) in memory of her mother, is awarded for high attainments in chemistry.

The Williams Prize in Mathematics, in honor of Dr. Charles W. Williams (emeritus Professor of Mathematics), is conferred upon the junior mathematics major who has the highest grade-point average in mathematics and who plans to attend graduate school in mathematics.

The Young Scholarship, endowed by Henry Young of New York, is conferred upon the student attaining the highest record in a selected course in philosophy.

The following awards and prizes are conferred annually according to the terms and regulations of each award:

The Academy of American Poets University and College Poetry Prize, established through the Academy by an anonymous donor, is given each year by the department.

The Robert E. Akins Engineering Prize, established in 2005 by the family of Robert E. Akins, will be awarded to the student best exemplifying academic excellence, a socially responsible commitment to the greater community, and an enthusiasm for the study of engineering.

Athletic Awards. Various awards for excellence in intercollegiate sports, including the Forest Fletcher Track and Field Trophy and the Mathis War Memorial Wrestling Trophy, and intramural athletics are made each year. Further details may be obtained from the Director of Athletics.

The Sarah G. Ball Education Award, established in 2003 by the Ball family to honor Sarah Ball, Class of 2001, recognizes excellent preparation for teaching in elementary and secondary schools and a record of service to disadvantaged persons. The award will be presented to a graduating senior who is committed to teach in a school which services an impoverished community. The recipient of the award will receive recognition in the graduation program and a salary supplement for the first year of teaching, renewable for the second year.

The Garnet D. Baltimore, 1881, Rensselaer Award and Scholarship, established in 1981, commemorates Garnet Douglass Baltimore, Civil Engineer, Rensselaer's first African-American graduate. African-American, Hispanic, and Native American students majoring in mathematics and sciences at participating institutions are considered, with the award generally presented to the qualifying student with the highest grade-point average in mathematics and science. Consideration is also given to an individual's potential for success in a science-related career.

The Tommy Mac Baremore Debate Award, established in 1968 in memory of Tommy Mac Baremore, who was the victim of a drowning accident while a student at Washington and Lee, is presented in the form of a personal plaque each year to a student who has made an outstanding contribution to the University debate program.

The Carlyle Westbrook Barritt and Sidney J. Williams Jr. Spanish Prize Endowment is a permanently endowed fund at Washington and Lee University created by an anonymous donor to establish a prize to recognize an outstanding rising senior in Spanish. The student will be determined by the Spanish Department. The fund is administered by the head of the Romance Languages Department.

The John J. "Jack" Bowden Award was established in 1998 by the family and friends of John "Jack" Bowden, Class of 2000. A member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity, Jack was an avid tennis player and golfer who was respected by all who knew him for his friendly and enthusiastic personality. In recognition of their son and his love for Washington and Lee, the Bowden family established this memorial award to provide a stipend to an incoming work-study eligible first-years with financial need.

The Society of the Cincinnati Award. This award, established in honor of the Society of Cincinnati in the State of Virginia, is conferred by the faculty on the author of the best essay submitted during the session in competition for it. The essay should be a study of the principles for which the Society was founded, any phase of American military history, or some other acceptable subject in Colonial, Revolutionary, or pre-Civil War history of the United States. The essay must be submitted by May 1 to the special faculty committee on the Cincinnati award.

The Class of 1964 Fine Arts Prize is funded by the Class of 1964 Endowment for the Arts. A complete description of this fund is found in the Endowment Gifts section.

The Linda Cooper and Bobby Henderson Prize. Established in 2002 by Matthew Bevin '89, the Linda Cooper and Bobby Henderson Prize recognizes Cooper's and Henderson's long and faithful service to Washington and Lee University's dining services. The prize is awarded annually to a rising senior who has worked on campus for the three previous years. Preference is given to students working in dining services. The Director of Financial Aid, in consultation with the appropriate service supervisor, will select the recipient(s). In some years, the award may be split to recognize equally deserving students. It is Mr. Bevin's hope that the student(s) selected for this prize will be able to relinquish work responsibilities in their senior year and instead volunteer service in the Lexington and Rockbridge County community. Recipients of the prize are encouraged to communicate their service achievements with Cooper, Henderson and Bevin.

The Sidney M. B. Coulling Prize in English was established by a series of gifts started in 1986 by William C. Porth of Garden City, New York.  The award is made annually to a first-year or sophomore selected by the English Department for writing the best essay on a literary topic.  The fund is administered by the English Department Head.

The Ollinger Crenshaw Prize in American History, established by Nathan V. Hendricks III '66 '69L, in honor of beloved professor, Ollinger Crenshaw '25, is a permanently endowed fund at Washington and Lee University administered by the chair of the History department. The Crenshaw Prize will be awarded each year to a history major with special interest and achievement in American history. The recipient will be selected by the faculty in the Department of History.

The Decade Award promotes awareness of the contributions coeducation has made to the Washington and Lee community at-large. The award will be given to a rising junior who has shown involvement and leadership within the W&L academic and extracurricular communities and who has furthered discussions of women's issues on campus and beyond.

The Edward Dodd Award is given to the graduating senior who, in the study of philosophy, shows most clearly the qualities demonstrated by Edward Allen Dodd Jr., Class of 1967. Among these qualities are academic excellence motivated by a concern for ideas for their own sake, vigor in intellectual pursuit and resilience in the face of criticism, goodwill toward others encouraging them to higher achievement, and courage in the face of misfortune. The recipient of the award is announced during commencement exercises, and the recipient's name is engraved on a memorial plaque in the philosophy seminar room.

The John W. Elrod Unsung General Award. The Celebrating Student Success Committee, sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Students at Washington and Lee University, recognizes those students who contribute to University life in ways often not seen by the larger community and who bring both depth and breadth to the University community. A joint student-staff committee works throughout the year to recognize winner(s) who are involved in various campus activities.

The John M. Evans English Scholarship was created by H. Lamar Mixson, Jr. '70 in 2008 in honor of Dr. Evans' contributions to generations of students at Washington and Lee University.  The Evans English Scholarship is a permanently endowed fund providing scholarship support for outstanding English majors.  The recipient will be selected by the Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid in consultation with the head of the English department.  This fund is established in appreciation for Dr. Evans' commitment to teaching, his role as a mentor and his friendship.

The Frank J. Gilliam Award, named for Dean Emeritus Frank J. Gilliam as a tribute to his long and devoted service to Washington and Lee since 1926, is awarded annually to that student who has made the most valuable contribution to student affairs in one or more fields. Candidates are nominated by members of the student body and faculty, and the winner is selected by the Executive Committee of the Student Body. The award consists of a personal plaque and a cash donation to that University organization or department selected by the recipient.

The Michael K. and Linda Gorman Award is conferred on a student who is judged by the Theater Department faculty to best exemplify the virtues of selfless service to others engaged in the pursuit of artistic excellence. This award is made possible by gifts from family and friends in memory of Michael K. Gorman, the first Managing Director of the Lenfest Center for the Performing Arts.

The John Graham Award. This award, a bronze plaque, was established in memory of a beloved professor. It is given each year to that person who has contributed the most to fine arts.

The John McKenzie Gunn Scholarship was created in 1994 by Professor Gunn's former students in honor of his retirement after more than three decades of distinguished teaching. Professor Gunn began teaching at Washington and Lee in 1957 and was appointed Lewis Whitaker Adams Professor of Economics in 1993. The scholarship is awarded to a rising senior majoring in economics on the basis of outstanding achievement, leadership, and character. The Dean of the Ernest Williams II School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics and the head of the Department of Economics will appoint a selection committee to award the scholarship.

The Andrew M. Hemm Fund. This fund, made possible through a generous gift by Andrew M. Hemm '76, is dedicated to the promotion of language study and to the recognition of excellence among students of Chinese and Japanese languages and literatures. Yearly prizes are awarded to the two students who have contributed the most to their classes and to their fellow students in Chinese and Japanese, respectively. The prizes will be designated as:

The Andrew M. Hemm Prize for Excellence in Chinese
The Andrew M. Hemm Prize for Excellence in Japanese

Beyond academic prizes, financial resources from the fund are to be used by the Department of East Asian Languages and Literature, as deemed most beneficial and most appropriate, to promote the study of these areas.

The Craig Hinkel Prize was established in 2000 in memory of Otto and Ruth Craig Hinkel. The prize is awarded annually to a student (or students) who has (have) a dual interest in English and German literature; it is awarded in recognition of academic achievement, as determined by the heads of the Departments of English and German.

The William Hirschmann Memorial Award in Drama is given each spring to a junior or senior who has done outstanding creative work in drama and who gives evidence of general intellectual curiosity and accomplishment. The award was made possible by memorial gifts from family and friends.

The Vernon W. Holleman Jr. '58 Fellowship was established in 2000 by family, friends, and fellow alumni of Vernon Holleman as a memorial to honor a lifetime of commitment and dedication to Washington and Lee. Mr. Holleman was a member of the University's Board of Trustees from 1995 to 1999 and the recipient of the Distinguished Alumnus Award. Recipients of the summer fellowship will be Washington and Lee first-years or sophomores who (1) are domiciled in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area; (2) are in good academic standing; and (3) have a strong commitment to service and the values of the University. Applications shall be submitted to the Dean of Students with a proposal for a summer opportunity to expand leadership potential.

The Edward Jackson International Reporting Award is funded by The Edward Jackson International Reporting Fund. A complete description of this fund is found in the Endowment Gifts section.

The William A. Jenks Award was established by former students of Dr. Jenks, distinguished scholar and the William Kenan Professor of History, Emeritus. The recipient of the Jenks Award will be chosen by the Department of History. He or she will have shown strong academic promise as an undergraduate, and will have as his or her goal a scholarly career in the field of European History. The award is to be used for travel or for graduate school expenses. Awarded for one year, the grant may be renewed with approval of the Department of History.

The L. K. Johnson Marketing Management Excellence Award was created in 1998 by John W. Sinwell '57 to recognize the achievement of a graduating senior and honor the memory of L. K. Johnson, longtime Professor of Administration. The cash award is given at commencement to recognize a senior fulfilling specified criteria.

The Todd Jones '85 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1999 by family and friends to honor the memory of Todd Jones (1963-1966). Preference is given to students with a demonstrated interest in music and drama. Upperclass applicants may compete for a travel study experience by submitting a proposal that will enhance their own artistic development, and thereby strengthen the performing arts on campus. The fund will be jointly administered by the departments of music and drama.

The Emory Kimbrough Jr. Prize in Sociology and Anthropology, was established in 1987 by members of the faculty in memory of Professor Emory Kimbrough Jr. The annual prize will be made for outstanding achievement by a student majoring in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

The Kozak, Spencer, McGuire, Schwab Award is funded by The Samuel Kozak, Edgar Spencer, Odell McGuire, and Frederick Schwab Endowed Geology Fund. A complete description of this fund is found in the Endowment Gifts section.

The Thomas V. Litzenburg Jr. Prize was created by the Reeves Center in 2004. The award is made annually, at the discretion of the Reeves Center staff in consultation with the Art Department or another relevant department, to the student who submits the best paper on artwork in the Center.

The James Jinkins Livesay, M.D. Premedical Award was created in 1997 by Mrs. Kittie Jinkins Livesay and Dr. William Rugeley Livesay of Houston, Texas, in honor of their son, a member of the Class of 1969 and the recipient of an honorary degree from Washington and Lee in 1996. The prize is awarded annually, by vote of the Health Professions Advisory Committee, to an outstanding graduating senior already admitted to medical school, who manifests superior potential to become a credit to the health profession.

The George A. Mahan Awards for Creative Writing were established under the will of George A. Mahan of Hannibal, Missouri, a "Lee student," who died in 1936. Prizes are offered to the first-years, sophomore, junior, and senior who submitted the best prose work in his or her class. One prize is offered to the first-years, sophomore, junior, or senior who submitted the best verse. Rules governing the Mahan Awards competition may be secured from the Department of English. All entries must be submitted to the head of the Department of English by the announced date during the spring term.

The Joseph R. Martin Prize is given in honor and memory of Joseph R. Martin (1950-2004), Class of 1972, by his family and many, many friends. Joseph, known affectionately as "JoJo" by nearly everyone, was co-captain of the 1971 W&L football team, an honors graduate with a BA, major in history, and a lifelong devotee of the fine arts. The prize is to be awarded upon graduation to an undergraduate student who has compiled a noteworthy academic record and who has demonstrated the high honor and integrity expected of all Washington and Lee students, on campus and away. The person selected will have been a positive influence on the lives of fellow students, a student whose physical, intellectual and moral endeavor in one or more extracurricular activities (whether or not sponsored by the university) has best demonstrated the classical concept of arete and one who has gained distinction through production of creative work in the fine arts at Washington and Lee University.

The Mason Family Endowment Fund is a permanently endowed fund at Washington and Lee University.  The Fund supports The Matthew J. Mason Latin Prize and helps underwrite the many educational events and activities of the Classics Department, such as seminar series and special speakers that are so important in enriching the academic life of the University.  The Matthew J. Mason Latin Prize is to be awarded annually to the outstanding student in Latin in the senior year to be selected by the faculty of the Classics Department.

The Adrian L. McCardell Scholarship was established in 2002 through the will of Adrian L. McCardell, Class of 1929. The scholarship is to be awarded to a junior majoring in commercial banking at the Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics.

The Anece F. McCloud Excellence in Diversity Award is given to the members of the Washington and Lee community who have demonstrated a personal commitment to promoting diversity awareness, acceptance, and appreciation through various means and on various levels of campus life. Each year, a member of the faculty or administration and a senior member of the student body are recognized for his or her efforts in making Washington and Lee University a more diversity-conscious and welcoming environment.

Christopher Merrill Main History Prize. This annual prize is named in memory of Christopher Merrill Main, Class of 1994, and is awarded to an exceptional senior who, through the spoken tongue or journalistic or literary expression, has shared his or her humor, wit and storytelling prowess with classmates and professors in contributing to a community where friendship, camaraderie, and goodwill flourish. It is hoped that the recipient be a gregarious History major who has an abiding love for Washington and Lee.

The Clark R. Mollenhoff Award was established in 1992 by his widow, Jane S. Mollenhoff, to memorialize the extraordinary accomplishments of one of the nation's most outstanding and widely respected journalists, who served on the journalism faculty at Washington and Lee for 15 years until his death in 1991. The award is given each year to a junior journalism major at Washington and Lee who shows unusual promise and achievement. The stipend enables the award recipient to undertake a project of professional or academic merit. The award is administered by the head of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communications.

The John Preston Moore III Award was established in 1996 from a bequest by Anna D. Moore in memory of John Preston Moore III, the income of which is to be awarded annually to the outstanding student in history in the senior year to be selected by the Department of History.

Nabors Service League McLoughlin Award for Volunteerism is presented annually by the Nabors Service League to students who demonstrate a commitment to their community through innovative service. Recipients of the McLoughlin Service Award embody vision, innovation, dedication, and leadership. A book, relating to their service and/or social interest, is presented to the recipient, and a copy is given in their name to Leyburn Library.

The E. Marshall Nuckols Jr. Honor Scholarship is funded by The E. Marshall Nuckols Jr. Honor Scholarship. A complete description of this scholarship is found in the School of Law Scholarships section.

The Cullum Owings '03 Memorial Fellowship was established in 2003 by family, friends and fellow students of Cullum Owings to celebrate his dedication to Washington and Lee and the concept of honor. The fellowship will be awarded annually by a committee of family, faculty and students to a Washington and Lee rising senior or junior who is articulate, thoughtful and of outstanding personal integrity. The recipient will visit secondary schools and alumni chapters to engage in dialogue on academic integrity and honor systems. A portion of the award will be credited against tuition for the year.

The Zachary Alan Parmenter Prize was established in 2005 by the family of Zachary Alan Parmenter '07, in his memory. The Parmenter Prize is to honor a student at Washington and Lee University who is active in the Generals Christian Fellowship and who, in the opinion of Washington and Lee's Coordinator of Religious Life and based upon recommendations from other campus representatives and community religious leaders, embodies the union of intellect and faith exemplified by Zach in his life and by the way he lived. The nominees should be active both on and off campus. This prize, upon selection by the President in the spring of each year, will be announced in the graduation bulletin.

The Phi Beta Kappa Sophomore Award for Scholarship is presented annually to that sophomore who attains the highest cumulative grade-point average during his or her first three semesters at Washington and Lee.

The Edward Lee Pinney Prize was established in 1981 in memory of Dr. Edward L. Pinney, who was Professor of Politics at Washington and Lee for 17 years. The prize is awarded annually to an undergraduate student who demonstrates extraordinary commitment both to personal scholarship and to the nurturing of intellectual life at Washington and Lee.

The Brackett Priddy '00 Memorial Fund was established in 2008 by a group of Brackett's friends and classmates led by Pullen Daniel '00 and with support from the Priddy Family. The Priddy Fund is a permanently endowed fund at Washington and Lee University providing support and recognition for students who exhibit courage and character in the face of overwhelming odds as determined by the Dean of Student Affairs and in consultation as feasible in the future with the Priddy family or identified heirs or family representatives.

Dr. William W. Pusey III Award was created in 1981 by the Executive Committee of the Student Body. The award is presented to the member of the faculty or administration who has made the greatest contribution to Washington and Lee University.

The Edith Lemberg Reese and Harold Augustus Reese Sr. Prize in Physics was established in 2005 by the family of Professor Ronald Lane Reese in memory of his parents. The prize is to be awarded annually, at the discretion of the faculty of the Department of Physics and Engineering, to a graduating senior physics major pursuing a Ph.D. in physics, astronomy, or mathematics. Hard work, superior academic performance, enthusiasm and service to the department, University, and community are factors to be considered in making the award.

The Ring-tum Phi Awards are administered jointly by the Publications Board and the editorial staff of the student newspaper. Under the terms of the awards, five individual plaques are presented annually to members of the University administration, faculty, staff, or student body who have rendered outstanding service to any phase of life at Washington and Lee.

The Schlegel Prize for International Studies is a permanently endowed fund at Washington and Lee University to recognize annually the student in a Politics seminar who submits the best paper on Foreign Affairs or International Relations as determined by the Politics faculty. It also provides support for student participation in foreign affairs conferences and for other proposals related to international affairs. The fund was established in 2002 by Chi Psi Fraternity brothers, family, friends and colleagues in memory of Commander Robert Allan Schlegel '85 USN, who was killed in the terrorist attack on the Pentagon on September 11, 2001 and is administered by the Politics Department Chair in consultation with the Director of the Center for International Education.

The Todd Smith Memorial Award is funded by The Todd C. Smith Memorial Fellowship Fund. A complete description of this fund is found in the Endowment Gifts section.

The Dabney Stuart Prize, for the best essay written in the English Seminar for Prospective Majors, was established in 1999 in honor of Emeritus Professor of English Dabney Stuart by an anonymous donor.

The Robert Stewart Award in Music was established in 1991 to honor Robert Stewart, who served as Professor of Music and head of the department from 1954 to 1988. It is given each year to a graduating senior who has, in the opinion of the Music Department faculty, contributed most significantly to music at Washington and Lee.

The Marcellus Henry Stow Award in Geology. M. H. Stow taught geology at Washington and Lee from 1926 to 1957. He was head of the department and an internationally known sedimentologist. During the Second World War he was director of the mining division of the War Production Board. This award was established by his former students. The award is made to an outstanding geology major on the recommendation of the head of the department.

The Jay W. Stull Memorial Award was established in 1968 in memory of Captain Jay W. Stull, Class of 1960, who gave his life for his country in Vietnam. The award is made upon the recommendation of the United States Marine Corps in the fall of each year to that Washington and Lee member of the Senior Marine Platoon Leaders Class who attains the highest ranking during the preceding summer camp training school.

The Jim Stump Prize in German honors a devoted alumnus of the Class of 1953. It is awarded annually, at the discretion of the Department of German and Russian, to an undergraduate of exceptional achievement in German.

The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Medallion. This memorial, established by the Southern Society of New York in honor of its first president, is awarded each year by vote of the Washington and Lee University faculty to that student in the graduating class who excels in high ideals of living, in spiritual qualities, and in generous and disinterested service to others.

The Joseph and Georgiana Topinka Memorial Scholarship was established in 2003 by Sharon and Joseph L. Topinka in honor of his parents. The Scholarship is to be awarded to a rising junior in the second semester of the academic year who plans to pursue a career in either public or private accounting. The recipient is to be selected by the faculty of the accounting department in consultation with the Dean of the Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics. The student selected must be of high moral character, demonstrate economic need, and present a grade-point average of B (3.000). The award is to be used toward payment of senior year tuition or to pay down educational loans.

The James A. Vann III '61 Prize in European History was established in 1986 in memory of James A. Vann III by friends and former classmates. The award is to be made annually to a junior or senior submitting the best paper in the fields of modern European history or architecture.

The Ronald F. Waring - John G. Alnutt Endowment is a permanently endowed fund at Washington and Lee University supporting an annual award to a graduating journalism major who best exemplifies the values and skills of excellent copy editing. Award recipients are selected by the Journalism and Mass Communications faculty. This fund honors two gentlemen whose work as copy editors reflected the professional values of credibility, balance, civility, fairness, good taste, good humor and care for the English language. The award will be administered by the Head of the Journalism Department.

The John W. Warner Public Service Award Fund, established by the University from the unrestricted gift made in 2007 by the Honorable John W Warner, Class of 1949, is a permanently endowed fund at Washington and Lee University. It provides recognition and a financial stipend to one or more undergraduate students who show interest in and/or promise for leadership in government service, with a particular emphasis on the potential for elective public office. The awards shall enable the recipients more freely to seek and pursue opportunities with the goal of educating them about possible career choices in government service/elective public office. The recipients shall be selected annually at the discretion of the Director of the Washington Term Program (or by a successor as chosen by the Dean of the Williams School). The Fund will be administered by the Dean of the Williams School, in consultation with the Financial Aid Office and in accordance with policies and procedures set by the Board of Trustees.

The Washington Family Descendants Scholarship Award was established in 1982 by approximately 600 members of the National Society for the purpose of promoting and supporting scholarship in the field of American history. The award is made annually to the rising senior history major who attains the highest grade-point average following his or her first three years of study. Selection is made by the head of the History Department.

The Maxwell P. Wilkinson Scholarship in English was established in 1988 by Mary Vail Wilkinson of Stamford, Connecticut, in memory of her father, a member of the Class of 1928. The scholarship is to be awarded, without consideration of financial need, to a major in the Department of English, who is a resident of a southern state, and who shows love of the written, read, and spoken English word. Recipients are to be nominated by the Department of English.

The Warren M. Wilson Award in African History was established in 1986 by Mr. Anthony M. Wilson and Professor Henry P. Porter Jr. An award was made for the first time at commencement in 1990 and is awarded annually to a senior for graduate study in African History.

The James Robert Wingert III '85 Award in Accounting is a memorial award to provide an annual prize to a senior, based on excellence of performance in Accounting.

The James S. Wood Prize in German is awarded annually by the German department to honor an alumnus of the Class of 1965 who was killed in Vietnam.

The Jean Amory Wornom Award for Distinguished Critical Writing, established in 1980 in memory of the mother of two majors in the department with distinguished academic records at Washington and Lee, is given annually to the student judged by the department to have submitted the best piece of discursive or critical writing-essay, term paper, or thesis-in an English course during the spring term of the preceding academic year or the fall and winter terms of the year in which the award is made.

The Frank G. Young Award in Geology was established by the geology department in 1989 in honor of Frank G. Young, a former student and trustee of the University. The award is made to geology majors in recognition of exceptional excellence in academic performance in geology courses.