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Washington and Lee University

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IRELAND

Supervised Study in Ireland and Irish Poetry

ENG 388 (4 credits)
ENG
387 (6 credits)
4 weeks or 6 weeks in Ireland
Prof. Marc Conner

In the spring of 2010, Professor Marc Conner of the English Department will lead for the fifth time the Spring Term in Ireland Program. There will be two concurrent versions of the program: the four-week term, devoted entirely to the West of Ireland, and the six-week term, spending 4 weeks in Ireland's west and 2 weeks in Dublin.

The four-week term: "The West of Ireland"~ We spend four weeks in the storied and rugged southwest of Ireland, based in Dingle and Tralee, County Kerry. From here we visit and study the dramatic Irish landscape of the Dingle Peninsula, the Blasket Islands, and the Ring of Kerry; prehistoric burial tombs and stone forts; Celtic and early Christian sites; the great medieval monasteries; the Norman and Elizabethan castles; and such lovely Irish towns as Killarney, Dingle, and Galway. We also travel throughout the west of Ireland, focusing on sites associated with the great 20th-century Irish writers, such as Yeats's tower of Thoor Ballylee, Lady Gregory's estate of Coole Park, and the Aran Islands so beloved of J.M. Synge. We read a range of Irish literature, from medieval poetry and mythic saga to the great achievements of the Irish Revival such as the poetry of Yeats and the plays of Synge, and also work from more recent Irish writers such as Heaney and O'Brien. Students write two interpretive essays, several "site readings," a travel journal, and create an experiential web log of their travels. 4 credits in English at the 300 level / English 388. (Late British distribution)

The six-week term: "Ancient and Modern Ireland" ~ The six-week term runs concurrent with the four-week course. Weeks 1-4 are identical to the four weeks in the West of Ireland (above), except students do not produce the web log. Weeks five and six are spent in Ireland's capital, the great city of Dublin. We focus on the ancient and modern aspects of Dublin, exploring its Viking, Elizabethan, and Georgian heritage, as well as its Modern manifestations in the 20th and 21st centuries. Travel from Dublin includes the great monastery of Glendalough, the burial tombs of Newgrange, the Hill of Tara, and a 2-day trip to Belfast and Northern Ireland. Readings include Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce, whose cosmopolitan modernity offers such a stark contrast to the Celtic revivalism of Yeats and Company. Students write an additional interpretive essay as well as two more site readings. Six credits in English at the 300 level / English 387. (Late British distribution.) Both courses include a mandatory, 1-credit pass/fail "orientation" course during the winter term (English 385). Prerequisites: at least 1 course in English at the 200-level or above. Non-majors are very welcome.meals, activity costs (entrance fees, etc.) and mandatory supplementary health and emergency medical evacuation insurance.

ENG 388 meets major requirements for a 300-level English course and the FDR-HL requirement.

ENG 387 meets major requirements for a 300-level English course and the FDR-HL requirement.

PROGRAM FEE 4-week term ENG 388: (paid to W&L) $3,735 includes room, ground transportation, guest lectures, some meals, activity costs (entrance fees, etc.) and mandatory supplementary health and emergency medical evacuation insurance.

Additional costs (4-week term):  International airfare (est. $500); meals (est. $700), miscellaneous spending money (around $300)

PROGRAM FEE 6-week term ENG 387: (paid to W&L)  $5,795 includes room, ground transportation, guest lectures, some meals, activity costs (entrance fees, etc.) and mandatory supplementary health and emergency medical evacuation insurance.

Additional costs (6-week term):  International airfare (est. $500); meals (est. $1,400), miscellaneous spending money(around $450).

Note:  Program costs could change if currency exchanges rates fluctuate or if there is a necessary and unanticipated change in the itinerary.

For more information contact Professor Conner and visit http://ireland.wlu.edu/.