WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY REGISTRATION
Changes to the 2008-2009 Catalog and Special Announcements for Spring Term 2009
(updated to )

For accurate and up-to-date information, please see "Recent Changes" and the course listing on the University Registrar's web page at http://registrar.wlu.edu/ .

by academic discipline:

Accounting Environmental studies Neuroscience
African-American Studies First-Year Seminars (FS) Philosophy
Anthropology French Physical Education
Art History Geology Physics
Art Studio German Politics
Biology Greek Portuguese
Business Administration History Poverty & Human Capability
Chemistry Interdepartmental  Psychology
Chinese Italian Public Speaking
Classics Japanese Religion
Computer Science Journalism & Mass Communication Romance Languages
Dance Latin Russian
East Asian studies Latin American and Caribbean Studies Russian Area Studies
East Asian Languages & Literatures Lit in Translation  Sociology
Economics Mathematics Spanish
Education Medieval & Renaissance Studies Theater
Engineering Military Science/ROTC University Scholars
English Music Women's Studies

Accounting (ACCT)

African-American Studies (AFAM)

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 180: FS: The Wired Self: Communication Technologies, Society, and You (3). This course is an in-depth investigation into how new communication technologies - most specifically the mobile phone and the Internet - affect society and personhood, in a cross-cultural perspective. Students enrich their understanding of the personal, social, and global impact of the communication technologies that they use every day and usually take for granted. This seminar is discussion and project based. Students present readings in class and produce original ethnographic research on local use of mobile phones and the Internet. (SS4) Goluboff

ANTH 290: Land in Cherokee Culture, Religion, and History (3). No prerequisites. This seminar examines the basic cultural and religious assumptions that bind the Eastern Band of Cherokees to their homelands. During the opening weeks, participants learn about the interconnections among Cherokee spirituality, concepts of land, and tribal identity as they found expression in pre-reservation Cherokee lifeways. The class next examines how these interconnections and lifeways were affected by contact with colonial and U.S. governments. The seminar also examines the ongoing efforts of present-day Eastern Cherokees to maintain and apply traditional ecological knowledge to contemporary life. Markowitz

ANTH 377: Field Methods in Archaeology (6). Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Students in this course gain intensive, first-hand experience with archaeological methods of excavation, site recording, artifact analysis and interpretation. In Spring 2009, the course is held at Monticello near Charlottesville, with students participating in excavating the remains of Thomas Jefferson's overseer's house (c. 1806-1822) as part of a research project focused on issues of race and class in American history. In addition to exposure to diverse field methods on site, students also benefit from classroom-style seminars, guest lectures, laboratory-based artifact analysis, pertinent readings and written assignments, and field trips. Bell

Art History (ARTH)

ARTH 380: Modern Latin American Art (3). This lecture course surveys the art and architecture of Latin America from circa 1900 to the present. Topics include the rise of modernismo in Latin America; art in service of nationalism; and the growing Chicano movement in the United States. Among the artists covered are Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Tarsila do Amaral, Joaquín Torres-García, Wilfredo Lam, Lygia Clark, and Francisco Botero. (HA, HE4a) Lepage

ARTH 390: Arts of the Tea Ceremony (3). Prerequisite: Art History 140 or permission of instructor. Understanding the Japanese tea ceremony and the role it has played in traditional Japan is a gateway to understanding many aspects of Japanese culture today. This course examines the history of tea practice, and explores the arts that have entered into and emerged from the evolution of the tea ceremony: teahouse architecture and garden design; ceramics, lacquer, and other media used for the various tea utensils; painting and calligraphy; and flower arranging. We read literature about tea ceremony, discuss philosophies and rituals that have affected it, and try to understand its role in and impact on Japanese culture. "Hands-on" opportunities and demonstrations occur, as they can be arranged. (HA, GE4a) O'Mara

ARTH 398: Museum Studies (3). An exploration of the history, philosophy and practical aspects of museums. Topics of discussion include governance and administration, collections, exhibitions and education. The course alternates weekly readings and class discussion with field trips to regional museums. Requires short papers and a project. (HA, GE4a) Grover and Hobbs.

Art Studio (ARTS)

ARTS 223: Drawing Italy (3). A studio-art immersion course. Students live and draw on site in Rome, Spoleto, Cortona, Florence, and Venice with day trips to Pompeii, Assisi, Siena, Arezzo, Bologna and Padua. Students explore Italy's vast artistic heritage within its cultural context, then apply this experience to their own art while working in the distinctive Mediterranean light. Media include pen and ink, pastel, and watercolor. The last week of the course is spent on campus, choosing and refining a series of works to be exhibited in Wilson Hall in the fall of 2009. Olson-Janjic

ARTS 290: Alternative Photographic Processes (3). Prerequisite: ARTS 160 and permission of instructor. A process-based course exploring photography beyond the traditional darkroom or digital print. Processes taught may include cyanotype, van dyke, kallitype, platinum/palladium, liquid emulsions, and wet plate collodion. Students also learn methods for creating larger negatives through both traditional and digital methods for use in contact printing processes. This course presents alternative processes within the context of the history of photography, and includes readings, image presentations, and discussions of contemporary artists who are currently working with these antique methods. Lab fee required. (HA, HE4a) Bowden

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 230: Field Biogeography and Species Conservation (4). Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 113 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: ENGL 294. Students should register only for these two courses during spring term. This course emphasizes the patterns of diversity encountered during visits to different regional plant communities where we use professional floristic works to identify vascular plants. In addition, evolutionary and ecological explanations for patterns of distribution and extinction, and the lessons these teach for conservation, are explored. (SL, GE5a) Knox

BIOL 325: Ecological Modeling & Conservation Strategies (4). Prerequisite: MATH 101 or higher and BIOL 111 and 113, or permission of the instructor. This course is an intensive introduction to foundational methods in ecological modeling and their application, with emphasis on the dynamics of exploited or threatened populations and developing strategies for effective conservation. The emphasis of laboratory activities is on applied problem solving using techniques covered in lecture. Topics covered include: determining optimal harvest from exploited populations, population viability analysis, individual based models, and simulation modeling for systems analyses. Humston

BIOL 395: Neural Imaging (3). Prerequisite: BIOL 113, 215, 220 or permission of the instructor. This course examines how the architecture of specific types of neurons affect the neuron's ability to receive, process, and transmit synaptic information. In particular, we examine how some of the important dendritic differentiation cues can transmit arborization signals to the developing neurons. Topics also include neurogenesis, axonal pathfinding, and synaptogenesis. Students conduct original research in the laboratory and acquire skills with various imaging techniques and analytical tools. Watson

BIOL 397: Neuroendocrinology: Nature vs. Nurture (3). Prerequisite: BIOL 220, junior standing and permission of instructor. The study of the interactions between the brain and the endocrine system as a form of communication with and mechanism of regulation of the body. Thus, the neuroendocrine system is involved in almost every aspect of physiological regulation and communication. We review the literature, discuss implications, and study the mechanisms whereby the neuroendocrine system is shaped by internal (genetic) and external (environmental) factors during early development to control adult behaviors. Tsai

Business Administration (BUS)

BUS 195: Art in Business (3). This course is an investigation of the multiple roles art and design play in the business world, covering all key areas of marketing communications. The emphasis is on the principles of sound marketing planning: research, setting marketing objectives, strategy and execution, as manifested in the creative output: the logo, the brand, the package, the retail space, and the advertisement. Requirements include a team project, some term papers and a final exam. Macdonald

BUS 306: Seminar: Computer Forensics (3). This course introduces the student to the basics of computer networks, including their components, functionality, and vulnerabilities. The course examines computer-related crimes such as hacking, theft of intellectual property, identity theft, and fraud. Students learn how consumer and citizen information is stored and shared, and how electronic financial transactions are conducted and the importance of computer forensics within areas such as accounting, business, and the law. Students also learn about the tools and methods used by law enforcement when investigating cybercrimes, how to perform computer crime investigations, and the recovery and analysis of digital evidence. Pratt

Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 191: Science of Cooking (3). This course may not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for CHEM 295 when the topic was culinary chemistry. An introduction to the structure of molecules as well as their inter- and intramolecular interactions, with an emphasis on those species of importance to food and cooking. Chemical reactivity as it relates to cooking, food preservation, and spoilage is also discussed. Coursework includes cooking and food-based experiments as well as field trips to local food production facilities. (SC, GE5c) France.

Chinese (CHIN)

CHIN 100, 115 or 265: Chinese Language and Culture (6). With no prerequisite for knowledge of China and Chinese, students are engaged in elementary Chinese classes interspersed with lectures and classes on Chinese literature and culture. Topics include Chinese art, history, painting, tai chi, oriental gardening, Chinese customs and festivities, and Chinese food. Course participants take field trips to the landmarks of Shanghai, watch a famous Chinese acrobatics show, and visit cultural sites neighboring Shanghai. The program finishes with a cultural tour to the ancient cities of Xi'an and Beijing. Fu

Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 287: The Hellenic Tradition: Greece and Turkey (6). This course offers an exploration of Hellenic civilization in its diverse forms: the Bronze Age, the Classical period, Late Antiquity, and the Byzantine era. We study the landscape, architecture, art, and culture of the broad Greek world, from the beginnings around 1000 BC to the fall of Constantinople in 1453 AD. The trip includes investigations of Athens, Mycenae, Delphi, Thessaloniki, and Istanbul, not to mention numerous smaller sites along the route. Our study of the ancient past does not neglect the modern continuities in the culture, food, and religion of modern Greece and Turkey. Students become intimately familiar with the major artistic traditions and monuments of the Greek tradition, including the classical Acropolis and the Byzantine cathedral Hagia Sophia, now a Muslim mosque. Two weeks are spent on campus studying the history and monuments, followed by three weeks abroad, concluding at W&L with one week of student reports. Crotty

Computer Science (CSCI)

CSCI 102: Introduction to Computational Modeling (4). Appropriate for non-majors. This course provides a hands-on understanding of the computational methods that support science and technology now and that will be essential for success in the science, engineering, and business worlds of the near future. The central theme of the course is building computational models of the processes that surround us every day, from the effects of drugs on the body to the formation of galaxies in the universe to the interactions of nations in the global economy. Classroom lectures and textbook readings are supplemented with lab exercises implementing the models using state-of-the-art software tools. (SC, GE5c) Levy

CSCI 295: Language Lab in LISP (3). An introduction to the LISP programming language and its applications. Topics include syntax, semantics, and the style of programming and problem solving supported by the language. Lambert

CSCI 297: Tools for Software (3). Prerequisites: CSCI 112 or permission of the instructor. This course is the study of software tools and environments commonly used throughout the software life cycle and beyond. The course focuses on the tools used in the software life cycle, the goals of each tool, how the tools are used in practice, and the technology behind the tools. Students learn how to choose from among a variety of different tools for a given software engineering task. Tools include integrated development environments, version control, software testing, build tools, static analysis, performance profiling, and debugging. In addition, we learn Unix commands and bash scripting. Sprenkle

Dance (DANC)

DANC 390A: Aerial Dance (3). Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, significant dance or athletic training, no injuries, and no issues with heights. This is a rigorous comprehensive technical training and performance course. This class focuses on rigging, safety, and harnessing procedures initially and then moves onto technical training of the body, lessons in kinesiology, and preparing the body for the rigors of aerial dance. Students rehearse and prepare an aerial performance for the end of the term. Davies

DANC 390B: Topics in Dance Composition: Latin Dance (3). Prerequisite: Dance 220 and permission of the instructor. This studio course focuses on the development of technical skills in a wide range of Latin dance styles including Flamenco, Salsa, Afro-Cuban, Conga, and Mambo. Strengthening of the body, improved flexibility, coordination and concentration as well as basic Latin dance terminology are explored. Assigned readings, class discussion, and the practice of Latin dance techniques are integrated through a historical narrative that reveals the changes, mutations and growth of Latin dance styles and their interrelatedness. The class culminates in a performance presentation. Meythaler

East Asian Languages and Literatures (EALL)

East Asian Studies (EAS)

Economics (ECON)

ECON 288: African Economic Development (3). This course introduces issues in African economic development, with an emphasis on both contemporary and historical perspectives. Course participants discuss economic and political institutions and social change in contemporary Africa, and historical patterns of economic and political development, with a strong emphasis on Ghana as our central case study. We emphasize concerns about public action and human capability and, in doing so, explore links to history, sociology, anthropology, and religion. Blunch

ECON 295A: Economics of the Middle East (3). Prerequisites: ECON 101, 102, and sophomore standing. This course is the study of several topics related to the economies of Middle Eastern countries. Topics include but are not limited to the economic history of the region, economic growth, the oil industry and OPEC (The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries), Dutch disease, population, and globalization. With focus on selected countries, the tools of economic analysis are applied to provide insight into the problems of the region. Students write a research paper on a topic and a country of their choice related to the course theme. Ghandi.

ECON 295B: Economics of Financial Panics (3). Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102. Though we are only at the beginning of a financial crisis, much ink has been spilled describing it and comparing it to the great depression. Only time will tell of the severity of this crisis, but certain facts are already clear. This course looks at both the current financial crisis and historical examples that may provide some insight into how this bubble grew and burst. In particular, we examine how the financial sector is perceived in film and look at primary sources on the interrelationship between Wall Street and Main Street. Finally, we come to a consensus on how the crisis emerged and what makes this crisis similar to ones in the past. Sarolli

Education (EDUC)

EDUC 280: Poverty and Education (6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course examines the complex interaction between poverty and education through a variety of activities, including field work in urban and rural settings, review of contemporary film on education in high poverty communities, and relevant policy research and journal readings. In addition, the course examines the challenges of education in high poverty settings or for individuals experiencing poverty as well as schools and communities attempting to overcome the obstacles that poverty creates. Students visit public and private charter schools and innovative educational programs in Washington, D.C. and in rural West Virginia and become immersed in urban and rural culture. Students enrolled in the course must be able to be off-campus for one to two weeks of the term. Additional details form the instructor. Dailey

Engineering (ENGN)

English (ENGL)

ENGL 233: Introduction to Film (3). An introduction to film focusing on the popular and critically privileged genre of epic. This course presents an historical survey of twentieth-century film stressing such basic concepts as auteur theory, genre theory, the role of technological advances, the debates surrounding film realism, and the relation between cinema and nationalism. Some possible directors and films include early classics by D. W. Griffith and Sergei Eisenstein; Selznick's Gone With the Wind, Ford's The Searchers, Kubrick's Spartacus and 2001: A Space Odyssey, Lean's Lawrence of Arabia and Dr. Zhivago, Coppola's Godfather Parts I and II and Apocalypse Now, Nichols's Angels in America, and such popular scifi, fantasy, and adventure epics as The Star Wars films, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Alien tetralogy, or the Jason Bourne movies. Note: the films are screened on Monday and Wednesday evenings before the regular class meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays. (HL, GE3) Adams

ENGL 293: Form and Freedom in Modern American Poetry (3). Robert Frost once said that writing free verse is like playing tennis without a net. This course explores that statement by studying several modern American poets. We examine varieties of free verse from Walt Whitman through Sylvia Plath, and compare those writers' works to poets like Frost and Richard Wilbur, who preferred traditional forms. We also see how individual poets have worked with both form and freedom throughout their careers. In the process we learn about sonnets, villanelles and sestinas, and conclude by sampling some contemporary experimental approaches. (HL, GE3) Brodie

ENGL 294: Topics in Environmental Literature (3). Corequisite: BIOL 230. This course focuses on three environmental writers from the 19th and 20th centuries. We read David Quammen's award-winning account of biogeography, The Song of the Dodo, both in its own right and as a guide to our other writers. We read Charles Darwin's The Voyage of the Beagle, his 1845 account of the five-year circumnavigation of the planet that took him to the Galapagos Islands and initiated his thinking about species and speciation. We read a selection of works by Alfred Russel Wallace, both his field work and his theoretical work. Finally, we read selections from the work of E. O. Wilson, who developed the modern field of biogeography. The courses meet MWF all day. (HL, GE3) James Warren

ENGL 380A: Advanced Seminar: Environmental Rhetoric (3). Open to non-majors and non-seniors. Fulfills the humanities requirement in Environmental Studies. A study of strategies of persuasion used in selected environmental debates, and the problem of conflicting work views within which these strategies make sense. Students read and watch several classic works of environmental rhetoric, including Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth, Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac, the film Erin Brockovich, and Terry Tempest Williams's Refuge, plus some essays, news reports, web sites, and government documents, studying how these works attempt to persuade and how successful they have been. They also write short analytical papers and work on a big project that advances a particular agenda of their own choosing. The goal of the course is to prepare students for the writing they may do later in life regarding the environment both at work and in their personal lives. We consider language as a lens through which we see the natural and human world, and what we can do as a result to clarify our own perceptions and to influence others to create the kind of community, nation, and world we want this to be. (HL, GE3) Smout

ENGL 380B: Advanced Seminar: 20th-Century Poetry in Form (3). A study of American, British, and Irish poetry that uses inherited forms, and particularly rhyme, in fresh, peculiar, and/or ground-breaking ways. Case studies include Wilfred Owen, Gwendolyn Brooks, James Merrill, Rafael Campo, Paula Meehan, and a sampling of other contemporary writers. (HL, GE3) Wheeler

ENGL 380C: Advanced Seminar: Western Encounters with the Islamic World (1100-1600) (3). A study of medieval and sixteenth-century Western texts that imagine Moslems complexly as both culturally other and fundamentally the same as Westerners when they replay the two great conflicts between Islamdom and Christendom, the invasion of Spain, France and Italy in the eighth and ninth centuries and the First Crusade: an eyewitness history of that crusade, The Song of Roland, and Tasso's Jerusalem Liberated. Then reading in the influential travel, chivalric, and pilgrimage literature in which Westerners report back about the achievements of Islamic civilization in the Middle East and beyond. The seminar begins with how medieval Moslems imagined themselves and imagined their relations with Christians, Jews, Hindus, and Zoroastrians in the great Arabian story collection, The Arabian Nights (The Thousand and One Nights). All texts read in translation. (HL, GE3) Craun

ENGL 380D: Advanced Seminar: Classic American Short Stories (3). A study of such recent masters as O'Connor, Carver, Lahiri, Danticat, and Proulx with some attention to their predecessors in the 19th and early 20th centuries (Poe, Hawthorne, Chesnutt, Gilman, and Cather). Students explore a variety of styles from minimalism to magical realism, attempting in the process to identify what is distinctive about this relatively new genre. (HL, GE3) Hall

Environmental Studies (ENV)

ENV 295: The Chesapeake is What We Eat (3). No prerequisites. How does what we eat affect our upstream and downstream neighbors? This seminar examines the ways our foodshed and watershed are interrelated. It also explores cultural attitudes and practices of eating and their consequences related to individual human health, the health of communities, and the health of land and waters, with a particular focus on the Chesapeake Bay watershed within its global context. Students consider industrial and organic farming, how globalization has influenced local food supplies, the slow-food and fast-food movements and the "new agrarianism" which includes not only techniques of food production and practices of rural living. Julianne Warren

ENV 395: Biodiversity: Ethics and Conservation (3). No prerequisites. What is biological diversity, where did it come from, where is it going, and why should we care? In this course, we examine the interface between ethics and science with regard to the current mass extinction, the role that humans play in it, and the implications for environmental policy. Cooper and Hurd

First-Year Seminars (title has "FS:" at the beginning, various disciplines, limit is typically 12-15)

ANTH 180: FS: The Wired Self: Communication Technologies, Society, and You (3). Prerequisite: First-year students only. This course is an in-depth investigation into how new communication technologies - most specifically the mobile phone and the Internet - affect society and personhood, in a cross-cultural perspective. Students enrich their understanding of the personal, social, and global impact of the communication technologies that they use every day and usually take for granted. This seminar is discussion and project based. Students present readings in class and produce original ethnographic research on local use of mobile phones and the Internet. (SS4) Goluboff

GEOL 100C: FS: General Geology with Field Emphasis (4). Prerequisite: First-year students only. Not open to those who have completed Geology 100 or 101. Washington and Lee is surrounded by some of the most interesting and classical geology of the entire Appalachian Mountain system. The campus lies right in the middle of the Great Valley of Virginia, within easy reach of the Blue Ridge Province and the Allegheny Mountains. This course takes advantage of our superb location, traveling to a new field site for each class meeting (including Goshen Pass, North Mountain, Devil's Marbleyard, Panther Falls, Island Ford Cave, and the Blue Ridge Mountains). We conduct a "hands-on" study of the basic principles of geology while unraveling the geologic history of the area. During the term, the class convenes for three four-hour class blocks each week to promote class discussions and to undertake laboratory and field-based investigations using maps, rocks and minerals, computational techniques, scientific writing, and poster presentations. This course is appropriate for those students curious about their natural world who enjoy spending time outdoors. Laboratory course credit. (SL) Knapp

HIST 180A: FS: The Civil Rights Movement from Brown to Bakke (3). Prerequisite: First-year students only. This course surveys the Civil Rights movement in the United States from 1954 to 1978, It exposes first-year students to the major civil rights issues and demonstrates the problems of this period through examination of selected manuscript documents, and assigned readings of selected primary and secondary literature pertaining to this period. Class discussion and three essay assignments. (HU) DeLaney

HIST 180B: FS: The Fin-de-siècle in Paris, Berlin, and Vienna (3). Prerequisite: First-year students only. Why did so many observers in the 1890s associate the "end of the century" with decadence, criminality, alcoholism, and sexual depravity? Why did this same decade give birth to so many of the social and cultural movements that have shaped the modern world? In this introductory level seminar, we analyze the impact of urbanization and technological progress on politics, literature, and the arts in three of Europe's greatest cultural centers. Topics include the artistic movements of naturalism and primitivism, the birth of modern feminism, the spread of Marxian socialism among workers, the critique of socialism and feminism by the Catholic Church, and Freud's campaign for the reform of "Victorian" sexual mores. Students write three short reaction papers on the assigned readings and a ten-page term paper on a topic of special interest to them. (HU) Patch

LIT 180: FS: Carmen and her Reincarnations in Opera and Film (3). Prerequisite: First-year students. An in-depth study of the mythical character Carmen, from the short story by Prosper Mérimée (1845) to her reincarnations on the opera stage and on screen. No knowledge of French, Spanish or Russian is necessary, although speakers of foreign languages will be encouraged to work with primary sources in the original text. (HL, GE3) Frégnac-Clave

POV 101A: FS: Poverty and Human Capability Studies: An Interdisciplinary Introduction (3). Limited to 15 first-years. An exploration of the nature, scope, causes, effects and possible remedies for poverty as a social, moral, political, economic, legal, psychological, religious, and biological problem. The course focuses on domestic poverty but also considers poverty as a global problem. This seminar parallels POV 101. Optional revision of papers and other optional assignments are available in both courses with the expectation that students in 101A frequently take advantage of these options. First-years who prefer a class with more experienced students should take 101 where they receive the same attention from the instructor in a slightly larger class setting. First-years who prefer the somewhat more intense seminar setting with grade-level peers only should enroll in 101A. Students in both courses are expected to perform orally as well as in writing. (HU) Beckley

THTR 180 & 180L: FS: Hardboiled L.A.: Film Noir and the City of Angels (3,0). Prerequisite: First-year students only. In this First-Year Seminar, we study some of the major classical films noirs of the 1940s and '50s (such as Double Indemnity and Kiss Me Deadly), specifically films that focus on Los Angeles, a city that is more often than not depicted as a city of corruption and dreams dashed and deferred. We also consider neo-Noirs (such as The Long Goodbye, Devil in a Blue Dress, and Blade Runner). The course examines how these recent films re-interpret the Noir tradition and how they grapple with the social and cultural forces at work within modern L.A., including gender, race, and globalization. Lab component for film screenings required. (HA) Reichek

THTR 181: FS: Experimental Theater (3). Prerequisite: First-year students only. This course explores the diverse experimental theater movements that mark the 20th century. Anti-realist styles such as symbolism, surrealism, theater of the absurd, and post-modern performance are studied for their rebellious approaches to acting, language, sound, gesture, story, setting, theater space, and audience. Through textual analysis and hands-on performance, students engage the artistic goals and cultural contexts shaping these various attempts to re-define theatrical art, culminating in the development of original student performance art. (HA) Jew

French (FREN)

FREN 342: La France Moderne: Romanticism in French Poetry, Prose and Theater (3). Prerequisite: FREN 273 or equivalent and permission of instructor. A literary delving into French romanticism that, as an artistic movement or style with socio-political roots, arose, flourished and then declined during the first half of the 19th century. Among the masterpieces read, discussed and analyzed are poems written by Lamartine and Musset, a novelette by Chateaubriand, and novels written by Hugo and Stendhal. Students help determine how this course is conducted and how they can be tested in ways besides composition, which is one of its major components. Another of its features are Web-based visual forays into the geographical and historical settings of works studied. (HL, GE3) Fralin.

Geology (GEOL)

GEOL 100C: FS: General Geology with Field Emphasis (4). Prerequisite: First-year students only. Not open to those who have completed GEOL 100 or 101. Washington and Lee is surrounded by some of the most interesting and classical geology of the entire Appalachian Mountain system. The campus lies right in the middle of the Great Valley of Virginia, within easy reach of the Blue Ridge Province and the Allegheny Mountains. This course takes advantage of our superb location, traveling to a new field site for each class meeting (including Goshen Pass, North Mountain, Devil's Marbleyard, Panther Falls, Island Ford Cave, and the Blue Ridge Mountains). We conduct a "hands-on" study of the basic principles of geology while unraveling the geologic history of the area. During the term, the class convenes for three four-hour class blocks each week to promote class discussions and to undertake laboratory and field-based investigations using maps, rocks and minerals, computational techniques, scientific writing, and poster presentations. This course is appropriate for those students curious about their natural world who enjoy spending time outdoors. Laboratory course credit. (SL) Knapp

GEOL 105: Earth Lab (4) Prerequisite: Three credits in geology and permission of the instructor. The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. For Spring 2009, the course travels for three weeks across the American Southwest to explore some of the most spectacular geology in the US, focusing mainly on the geology and evolution of the Colorado Plateau in Utah, Colorado and Arizona. (SL, GE5a) Staff. Spring

German (GERM)

GERM 263/303: Supervised Study Abroad (6). Better known as Bayrische Studienwochen, this is a six-week, total-immersion language program conducted primarily in the south of Germany. It provides students the opportunity to make large strides in their language proficiency by hearing and speaking exclusively German. Home-stays, class work, and culturally focused travel are the three pillars of the program. Students experience the small-town atmosphere of Eichstädt, the university campus life of Bayreuth, and the culture, history, and modern pulse of metropolitan life in Berlin and Munich. Weekend excursions take us to Bamberg and over border to Salzburg. Day trips highlight Würzburg and Nürnberg. Except when we are on the road, students live with German families. Extensive contact with German university students in Bayreuth is arranged. Central to the experience are three hours of class in the morning for five weeks with a curriculum consisting of advanced grammar and composition, supplemented with German literature and culture, and culminating with a term paper and final examination. GERM 263 satisfies the Foundation Requirement in language and three of the credits count toward major requirements. GERM 303 is for advanced students and counts toward the German major. Crockett

Greek (GR)

History (HIST)

HIST 180A: FS: The Civil Rights Movement from Brown to Bakke (3). Prerequisite: First-year students only. This course surveys the Civil Rights movement in the United States from 1954 to 1978, It exposes first-year students to the major civil rights issues and demonstrates the problems of this period through examination of selected manuscript documents, and assigned readings of selected primary and secondary literature pertaining to this period. Class discussion and three essay assignments. (HU) DeLaney

HIST 180B: FS: The Fin-de-siècle in Paris, Berlin, and Vienna (3). Prerequisite: First-year students only. Why did so many observers in the 1890s associate the "end of the century" with decadence, criminality, alcoholism, and sexual depravity? Why did this same decade give birth to so many of the social and cultural movements that have shaped the modern world? In this introductory level seminar, we analyze the impact of urbanization and technological progress on politics, literature, and the arts in three of Europe's greatest cultural centers. Topics include the artistic movements of naturalism and primitivism, the birth of modern feminism, the spread of Marxian socialism among workers, the critique of socialism and feminism by the Catholic Church, and Freud's campaign for the reform of "Victorian" sexual mores. Students write three short reaction papers on the assigned readings and a ten-page term paper on a topic of special interest to them. (HU) Patch

HIST 195: World Military History to 1857 (3). This course surveys the history of warfare from its first appearance in human societies to 1857. Our approach to the subject focuses on military systems and their development over time. We look at military systems as constantly evolving blends of organization, technology, strategy, and tactics. We also study how these systems have influenced – and been influenced by – politics, economics, religion, culture, and the environment. Our survey begins with an overview of the academic debates on the origins, purpose and meaning of warfare, and then proceed to examine specific examples of military systems in the ancient, medieval and early modern periods. This is a world military history course, with a strong emphasis on non-Western military systems of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. (HU, GE4b) Jennings

HIST 322: Seminar in Russian History: The KGB (3). Former Russian President and now Prime Minister Vladimir Putin rose through the ranks of the Soviet Union’s KGB (Committee for State Security), and its successor in the post-Soviet era, the FSB (Federal Security Service) has assumed great prominence in Russia today. This seminar analyzes the history of Russia's secret security service from the time of the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 up to the present. Students read and discuss several recent books that examine how the security apparatus has functioned domestically and how it has conducted espionage and other activities abroad, including within the United States. Students also write a research paper on a topic of their choice with the instructor’s approval. Bidlack

HIST 329: Seminar: French Revolution (3). The French Revolution is one of the most fascinating and momentous events in European history. At once "the best of times" and "the worst of times," this event was the origin of modern democracy, a period of tremendous political violence, and - some say - the origins of totalitarianism. Some questions we ask include: How did a revolution that began with proclamations of human rights turn into one of mass bloodshed in just a few short years? How did a desire for democracy lead to political violence? What was the nature of the Terror, and how can we understand it? We also examine how various schools of history have interpreted the Revolution, as well as the legacy of the Revolution for the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. (HU, GE4b) Horowitz

HIST 367: The History of Terrorism (3). This course provides a selective survey of the origins and evolution of terrorist organizations and their violence. Since large-scale, lethal terrorist actions involving attacks on civilians are relatively recent historically, special emphasis is placed upon the phenomenon in the 20th and 21st centuries. Much of the course focuses on the social divisions and conflicts that lead to terrorism and its increasingly lethal nature over time. Topics include "old terrorism" (as seen in Northern Ireland and Algeria), "new terrorism" (such as that associated with Al Qaeda), and the nature of and spread of weapons of mass destruction. (HU, GE4b) Senechal

HIST 369: The Era of Jim Crow (3). This seminar focuses intensely on the period from 1896 to 1945. It entails reading both primary and secondary sources culminating in a final paper. (HU, GE4b) DeLaney

Interdepartmental (INTR)

INTR 201: Information Technology Literacy (1). Pass/Fail only. Required of all Williams School majors. This course is a corequisite or prerequisite to Interdepartmental 202. MUST be completed by the beginning of the fall term of the junior year. Through the use of interactive online tutorials, students gain proficiency in and a working knowledge of five distinct areas of information technology literacy: Windows Operating System, spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), word processing (Microsoft Word), presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint), and basic networking (the Washington and Lee network, basic Web browsing, and Novell GroupWise). Lessons, exercises, practice exams and exams mix online efforts and hands-on activities. Ballenger, Boylan (administrator)

INTR 296 & ROML 295:The Road to Santiago (3,3).. Prerequisite: FREN 162, SPAN 162, or SPAN 164. The goal of this experiential-learning class is to immerse students in the physical and intellectual environments experienced during eight centuries by pilgrims traveling from southwest France through northern Spain to Santiago de Compostela. During the first three weeks of daily classes, students remain on campus and to study the cultural context and development of the route, to read the literary documents related to the journey, to discuss the art and architecture associated with the Camino, to prepare for the walk, and to examine the impact of pilgrimage on the political, economic, urban development, and social structure of northern Spain. During the remaining three weeks of the term, students travel to Spain or France and Spain to experience the adventure as well as the art, architecture and culture of the pilgrimage. (HU, GE4b) Lambeth, Ruiz, West-Settle

Italian (ITAL)

Japanese (JAPN)

Journalism (JOUR)

JOUR 221: Communication in Global Perspectives (3). Appropriate for non-majors. Critical appraisals of the relationship between media and power at the level of culture, institutions and social processes. The examination of the impact of globalization on local and/or national media and communications industries, and the role of the West in defining the global. Explore ways in which global media power is contested around the world and consider whether opportunities for resistance provided by new technologies represent a significant break with the past. Abah

J280: Legal Reporting (3). Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and JOUR J201.  Courthouses make the best beats. Every day the curtain goes up and a drama is acted out. Through criminal and civil cases, courts weigh in on nearly every controversial and polarizing issue facing the American public, from abortion and gun control to clean air and sex discrimination. The law has permeated American life so thoroughly that knowledge of the courts and legal principles is essential for any journalist, whether he or she wants to cover sports, business, entertainment or politics. This course introduces students to the U.S. court system, its players, its language and its impact on the public at large. Students learn how to identify newsworthy legal stories, read court documents and make sense of them in order to write clear, compelling news stories for mass audiences. The course is taught by Reynolds Professor of Legal Reporting Toni Locy, who has covered federal courts, the Justice Department and the Supreme Court for The Washington Post, USA Today, U.S. News and World Report, the Associated Press and others. Locy

JOUR 295A: Great Trials in History: The Impact of the Press and Public on Justice (3). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. Appropriate for non-majors. Americans love the suspense of a great trial, a tradition inherited from 16th-century England where townspeople were required to attend trials. From the Boston Massacre and Richard "Bruno" Hauptmann to Charles Manson and O.J. Simpson, citizens have long been fascinated by the high-profile trial which provide great theater and illuminate our potential for good and evil. Often in dramatic fashion, trials reveal our deepest secrets by exposing our weaknesses and dissecting our violent tendencies and obsessions. But is the press serving the public? Or is the press, through superficial, sensational coverage, failing the public and encouraging citizens to distrust their legal system? This course examines the issues of free press, fair trial, and justice through in-depth study of the trials of people accused of spying, committing war crimes, and murder. Locy

JOUR 295B: The Uncensored War: Viet Nam and the Journalists Who Covered It, 1959-1975 (3). A critical in-depth study of reporting and reporters during the Viet Nam Conflict from the death of the first American military adviser to South Viet Nam's last hours. Students meet at least one journalist who covered the conflict and are exposed to numerous examples of journalists' work. Weekly essays and an inclusive final research essay. Appropriate for non-majors. de Maria

JOUR 295C: Public-Service Media (3). Appropriate for non-majors. Students learn to use the department's state-of-the-art digital equipment to produce video, Web, and print media materials for local community service agencies. Study concepts and practices of communication for non-profit organizations. Service learning course. Artwick

JOUR 377: Media Management (3). Appropriate for non-majors. Stop the Presses! Using the case-study method, this seminar explores whether it makes economic sense for newspapers to discontinue publication on paper. Students examine readership trends, the green movement, production and distribution challenges, and labor issues unique to the news profession. We analyze the recent decisions of several prominent newspapers to forsake ink on paper and evaluate the viability of Web-only publications. The class takes at least one field trip to a Virginia newspaper to discuss industry economics with its managers. Luecke

Latin (LATN)

Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)

Literature in Translation (LIT)

LIT 180: FS: Carmen and her Reincarnations in Opera and Film (3). Prerequisite: First-year students. An in-depth study of the mythical character Carmen, from the short story by Prosper Mérimée (1845) to her reincarnations on the opera stage and on screen. No knowledge of French, Spanish or Russian is necessary, although speakers of foreign languages will be encouraged to work with primary sources in the original text. (HL, GE3) Frégnac-Clave

LIT 295: Sinophone Cinema & Fiction (3). This course includes a serial of contemporary films and fictions which is "sinophonic" in the sense that they are created in the broader Chinese context, ranging across mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and overseas Chinese communities. Through the visual and literary mediation, the course introduces cultural China from contemporary perspectives. It involves themes on history and radical politics, memory and nostalgia, homosexuality, and diaspora in a mutually referential manner to draw sketches of Chinese life in the contemporary global setting. (HL, GE3) Jin

Mathematics (MATH)

Math 195: Mathematical Modeling (3). Prerequisite: MATH 101. Assumptions, estimates, constraints, heuristics, and simulations - a course in the craft of translating real-world problems into idealized models that can be solved mathematically, and testing their validity. Siehler


Math 383: Explorations of the Symmetric Group (3). Prerequisite: MATH 321. Topics include matrix representations of groups, group algebras, irreducible representations, Maschke's theorem, Schur's lemma, group characters, inner products, decomposition of group algebras, tensor products, Ferrers diagrams, Young subgroups, Young tableaux, lexicographic ordering, and other topics as time permits. Finch

Medieval and Renaissance Studies (MRST)

MRST 110A: Medieval and Renaissance Culture: Living by the Code (3). This course explores notions of honor and honorable behavior in the European aristocratic culture of the High Middle Ages. We examine and analyze works of medieval literature, art, music, and architecture to study the ways warrior and courtly codes of honor and conduct, the ethos of chivalry and courtly love, and conceptions of the feminine ideal were articulated, constructed, and critiqued. We chart the transformation in court literature of the Germanic and feudal warrior (Hildebrandslied, Song of Roland) into the errant knight (Arthurian romances), whose quest is motivated by his love for the ideal woman. (HL, GE3) Prager

Military Science (MS)

Music (MUS)

MUS 195: Topics in Sound Technology (3). Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. An exploration of a specific topic in which students investigate the tools and techniques of modern sound technology. The class has an emphasis on hands-on learning with the latest recording hardware and software. Detailed study in advanced techniques in the composition of electronic music using Ableton Live. Audiovisual resources and required field trips may be used to enhance the course material. The class has an emphasis on hands-on learning with the latest recording hardware and software. Spice

Neuroscience (NEUR)

NEUR 395a: Neural Imaging (3). Prerequisite: BIOL 113, 215, 220 or permission of the instructor. This course examines how the architecture of specific types of neurons affect the neuron's ability to receive, process, and transmit synaptic information. In particular, we examine how some of the important dendritic differentiation cues can transmit arborization signals to the developing neurons. Topics also include neurogenesis, axonal pathfinding, and synaptogenesis. Students conduct original research in the laboratory and acquire skills with various imaging techniques and analytical tools. Watson

NEUR 395B: Neuroendocrinology: Nature vs. Nurture (3). Prerequisite: BIOL 220, junior standing and permission of instructor. The study of the interactions between the brain and the endocrine system as a form of communication with and mechanism of regulation of the body. Thus, the neuroendocrine system is involved in almost every aspect of physiological regulation and communication. We review the literature, discuss implications, and study the mechanisms whereby the neuroendocrine system is shaped by internal (genetic) and external (environmental) factors during early development to control adult behaviors. Tsai

NEUR 395C: Selected Techniques in Neurohistology (2). Prerequisites: NEUR 120 and junior major standing. A laboratory-intensive theoretical and practical overview of several common visualization techniques used in neuroscientific research. In weekly lab meetings, students are introduced to conceptual fundamentals and scientific underpinnings of selected histological and microscopic techniques through examples in the primary neuroscientific literature. In addition, students work in the lab setting to learn actively all aspects of histological procedure, including tissue preservation, preparation, and recovery, and tissue sectioning. Students learn and use several histological (including Nissl staining, histochemical staining, immunostaining, and gold staining) and microscopic techniques (including transmitted light and epifluorescent microscopy). Students also learn and employ basic digital image acquisition and manipulation techniques to create a course portfolio. Stewart

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 295A: Seminar: Utopia (3). This course aims to identify characteristics of the good life and the good society through the lens of some utopias, eutopias, and dystopias portrayed in well-known works of fiction. Questions addressed likely include: Does the good life involve pleasure, desire fulfillment, or something else? Which personal values or desires should count as authentic? What is a good society, and how can one be created? What is more important: individual self-development, or community development? Works of fiction include some of the following: Jack London's Iron Heel, George Orwell's 1984, Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, B. F. Skinner's Walden Two, Thomas More's Utopia, Marge Piercy's Woman on the Edge of Time, and Robert Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land. (HU, GE4c) Bell

PHIL 295B: Seminar: American Pragmatism (3). Recommended for students interested in American history and culture, as well as the history of ideas. Pragmatism is America's most distinct contribution to philosophy and one of its most distinct contributions to Western and ultimately world culture. Inspired by the horrors of the Civil War and hopes of Darwinism, Pragmatists argue that we live in an ever-evolving universe where truth has to do with concrete consequences, meaning has to do with testability, and mind is part of the natural order. In this course we look at the three great American Pragmatists, Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, and John Dewey, paying particular attention to their views on truth, meaning, and mind. (HU, GE4c) Goldberg

PHIL 295C: Seminar: Philosophy of Sport (3). This course offers an introduction to philosophy and ethics within the sporting context. We examine the values of sport—specifically by identifying "traditional values" in American society and studying how these values are reinforced through sport—and the bases for ethical decision making in sport. We also explore the moral significance of sport through readings and class discussion. Our topics include: the nature of sportsmanship, gender equity—and inequity—and the ethical issues involving enhancing performance in sports. (HU, GE4c) Jackson

Physical Education (PE)

Physical Education - IMPORTANT -- Read the instructions for PE registration at
registrar.wlu.edu/registration/regpe.htm


and the PE departmental information at
www.wlu.edu/x12426.xml

Students may express a preference for up to three skills courses as part of web registration. These preferences will be examined after the academic schedule is set and, if open and not in conflict with the academic courses, one may be placed in the schedule. Changes or additional sections may still be handled during the drop/add period.

 

The following Physical Education courses have an additional charge, billed to the student's account after registration:
PE 151 Golf; PE 170 Horsemanship; PE 176 Mountain Biking; PE 177 Dance Conditioning; PE 195C Scuba; PE 304 First Aid/CPR.

Physics (PHYS)

Politics (POL)

POL 290: Special Topics: Politics and Film (3). No prerequisites. Open to non-majors and majors (counts toward global politics field requirement) of all classes. Recommended for students interested in cinema, political dynamics, Russian area studies. This is an interdisciplinary study combining social science and humanistic models to help explain the dynamics of political entities. This term's focus is on Russia from 1905 to the near-future. Grading based on class discussion and essays. (SS2, GE6b) C. McCaughrin (Politics), G. McCaughrin (Russian)

POL 295A. Biopolitics (3). This course is open to students in politics or the life sciences. Counts towards the field requirement in American Politics. A survey of policy problems arising from advances in microbiology and genetics, particularly including human cloning, reproductive technologies, genetically modified organisms, forensic DNA, behavioral genetics, patenting genetic material, genetic medicine, and genetic counseling. (SS2, GE6b) Harris

POL 295B: Politics of Conspiracy Theories (3). Counts towards the political philosophy field requirement. In the Internet age, conspiracy theories are more popular than ever. Although social scientists and policy makers tend to dismiss conspiracy theories as rantings of the lunatic fringe, conspiracy theories can be studied fruitfully as symptoms of the various political tensions and misconceptions in domestic and international society. In this course, we examine examples of popular conspiracy theories from the US and around the world such as those surrounding the 9/11 attacks, the Kennedy assassination, the HIV epidemic in Africa, "the New World Order", and the Holocaust. We try to understand what attracts large segments of populations to explanations which diverge from normal social science. We also study the political issues and social anxieties that drive groups to distrust official explanations and commonly held historical beliefs, and try to understand how political beliefs are formed and shaped. We also study texts about what constitutes good social science, how social scientific theories are constructed, and what the social science standards for reliable evidence. Student draw upon a number of diverse of approaches, such as: philosophy of science texts, international relations articles, sociological studies, news reports, movies, documentaries, and works of fiction. (SS2, GE6b) Zarakol

POL 295C: The Poetry of Political Philosophy (3). Counts towards the political philosophy field requirement. John Milton and William Shakespeare are among the great epic and dramatic poets. Author of Paradise Lost, Milton was also an important 16th-century republican writer and political theorist, covering such topics as freedom of the press, religious and political liberty, and the responsibility of magistrates. How do Milton's political writings inform our understanding of free will, liberty, and authority in Paradise Lost, and vice versa? William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Anthony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus have as a source Sir Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's Lives. Both writers are concerned with factional strife, as well as the nature of military and political expertise. How do we understand the relationship between Plutarch's historical depictions and Shakespeare's dramatization of them? More broadly, how do we understand the efforts of poets to speak to political, moral, theological, and philosophic concerns? Can we discern in these poets the same concerns that animate political philosophers such as Plato and Machiavelli? If so, how does form relate to substance, substance to form? Word to deed, deed to word? Performance to theory to history? This course is taught in conjunction with the American Shakespeare Center (ASC) in Staunton, VA. Faculty associated with the ASC and actors lead seminars. Students commit to afternoon seminars and evening shows in Staunton in addition to regular class meetings. A fee is of $110 is required. (SS2, GE6b) Velásquez

POL 295D: American Campaigns and Elections (3). Counts towards the American government field requirement. This course explores the development of campaigns and elections in the United States, campaign finance, and the current methods and tactics of professional campaign management. In addition, students receive instruction in creating survey instruments and interpreting their results, and engage in generating their own polling data. The final project is a congressional campaign simulation. (SS2, GE6b) Courser

POL 295E: Entergy and Global Politics (3). Counts towards the international/global politics field requirement. This course examines energy security and its impact on global politics. The focus is on hydrocarbons – oil and natural gas – as a significant strategic factor in global politics. The issue is considered in historical context so as to develop broad perspective on its origins and salient role in the contemporary world. Economic, diplomatic, and military factors are considered. Significant technical issues such as the location and construction of key oil and gas pipeline infrastructure in Eurasia, the Middle East, and Europe are considered along with geological factors impacting on supply. Energy security policies of major and regional powers such as Russia, China, Japan, India, and the European Union are considered. (SS2, GE6b) Kiracofe

POL 295F: African Political Economy (3). Counts towards the international/global field requirement. This course introduces issues in African politics and society, with a particular emphasis on political economy in contemporary and historical perspectives, and complemented by the study of African philosophy and literature. Course participants discuss political institutions and social change in contemporary Africa, and historical patterns of economic and political development, with a strong emphasis on Ghana as our central case study. We emphasize concerns about public action and human capability and, in doing so, explore links to economics, history, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, religion, and literature. (SS2, GE6b) Dickovick

POL 385: British Politics in London (6). Prerequisite: POL 100 or 105. Open to all students by permission of the instructor. Counts towards the international/global field requirement. This course provides a study of the processes, institutions, and culture of the British political system, with comparative analysis of British and American media, political parties, and governmental institutions. The first three weeks are spent on campus with a classroom introduction to the British political system, followed by three weeks in London. The time abroad includes class meetings with guest lecturers, site visits to locations such as the Houses of Parliament, Scotland Yard, the Globe Theater, and a British newspaper, as well as day trips to Oxford and Cambridge. John

Portuguese (PORT)

PORT 101: Beginning Portuguese II (3). Prerequisite: PORT 100. Non-exchange students are also welcome to take the course. A second introductory level course designed to help prepare students in Portuguese language proficiency for participation in the US/Brazil Consortium for Environmental Studies, a federally funded W&L exchange program with the Universidade do Amazonas and the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Basic language skills are taught in preparation for a Portuguese language immersion course taught in Brazil as part of the exchange program. The immersion course focuses on language skills required for environmental studies. Pinto-Bailey.

Poverty and Human Capability Studies (POV) Students normally begin the study of Poverty and Human Capability with POV 101 (3), An Interdisciplinary Introduction. This course meets the requirement for credits (but not for one of the two areas) under GE4 and for FDR HU. Students who complete this course (or POL 215 (3), International Development, for international internships) are eligible to participate in Shepherd summer internships. See shepherd.wlu.edu/ for more information.

POV 101A: FS: Poverty and Human Capability Studies: An Interdisciplinary Introduction (3). Limited to 15 first-years. An exploration of the nature, scope, causes, effects and possible remedies for poverty as a social, moral, political, economic, legal, psychological, religious, and biological problem. The course focuses on domestic poverty but also considers poverty as a global problem. This seminar parallels POV 101. Optional revision of papers and other optional assignments are available in both courses with the expectation that students in 101A frequently take advantage of these options. First-years who prefer a class with more experienced students should take 101 where they receive the same attention from the instructor in a slightly larger class setting. First-years who prefer the somewhat more intense seminar setting with grade-level peers only should enroll in 101A. Students in both courses are expected to perform orally as well as in writing. (HU) Beckley

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 295: Current Advances in Psychological Science: Human Memory- Research and Application (3). Prerequisites: PSYC 111 or 112, or Neuroscience 120. An overview of the modern research and applied practices concerning various memory phenomena. Both theory and current methods of memory research are considered. Special emphases is given to the current memory literature and the design of empirical memory research. Frye, Roediger

PSYC 395: Development of Human Sexuality (3). Prerequisites: PSYC 113 and permission of the instructor. This course examines the fundamentals of the development and practice of sexuality in the human being and the historical, psychological, and psychosocial aspects of human sexuality from childhood to old age. The course covers major theories of the development of sexuality in heterosexual, gay, and lesbian people. Students also explore how sexuality itself may be "constructed" as a result of culture, media, and gender. Fulcher

Public Speaking (PSPK)

Religion (REL)

REL 295: Nature, Place, and the Sacred (3). As the nature of nature grows ever more strange to society and culture, the places of life change: forests become shopping malls, temples become tourist attractions, footpaths are superhighways, the home where you live is not just local but a node in the global web. What does it mean to inhabit today's places? Are there sacred places in it? What is the nature of place in our societies, and is there a place for nature in our cultures? How are today's sacred places different from the sacred places of others? Materials to consider may include literary, philosophical, theological, and artistic works. (HU, GE4d) Kosky

Rel. 340: Seminar in Asian Religions – Banaras: Life and Death in a Holy City (3). Banaras, the famed city on the Ganges, is considered sacred to Lord Shiva by Hindus. It is a center of Sanskrit learning, a place of pilgrimage, and the place where the dead are said to be able to attain release from the cycle of births. Yet 2500 years ago, the Buddha began his mission here, and many other episodes in India's religious history have since taken place here. For centuries it has also been home to a large Muslim community. This interdisciplinary seminar makes a case study of religious diversity by examining the relationship between private and public piety, the interweaving of sacred times and spaces in everyday life, the ways in which religious commitments define groups and inspire movements. (HU, GE4d) Lubin

REL 350: End Times: Apocalyptic Literature in the Biblical Tradition (3). A study of Jewish and Christian thought about divine intervention at the end of time with a focus on the ways in which apocalyptic impulses influence popular religion. We also explore certain critiques of the apocalyptic temperament in modern and post modern thought. (HU, GE4) Brown

Romance Languages (ROML)

INTR 296 & ROML 295:The Road to Santiago (3,3). Prerequisite: FREN 162, SPAN 162, or SPAN 164. The goal of this experiential-learning class is to immerse students in the physical and intellectual environments experienced during eight centuries by pilgrims traveling from southwest France through northern Spain to Santiago de Compostela. During the first three weeks of daily classes, students remain on campus and to study the cultural context and development of the route, to read the literary documents related to the journey, to discuss the art and architecture associated with the Camino, to prepare for the walk, and to examine the impact of pilgrimage on the political, economic, urban development, and social structure of northern Spain. During the remaining three weeks of the term, students travel to Spain or France and Spain to experience the adventure as well as the art, architecture and culture of the pilgrimage. (HU, GE4b) Lambeth, Ruiz, West-Settle

Russian (RUSS)

Russian Area Studies (RAS)

Sociology (SOC)

SOC 390: Microsociology (3). No prerequisites. An analysis of various models of social interaction with particular emphasis placed on social exchange, symbolic interaction, reality construction, and social dramaturgy. As each approach is studied, socialization and self development are examined within the context of social determinism and voluntarism. The course concludes with an integration of these orientations, focusing on ideological issues and the development of an emergent model of social interaction. Novack

Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 202: Supervised Study Abroad (6 or 3,3). A period of direct exposure to the language, culture, and people of Spain. The program includes supervised academic projects, lectures by native authorities, attendance at the theater and other cultural activities. Students majoring in subjects other than Spanish, as well as language majors, are encouraged to apply. Three weeks in Madrid and three weeks in Salamanca. Three credits may be in Spanish and three in another subject. Barnett, Mayock

SPAN 295: Hispanic Film (3). Prerequisite: Three credits from any 200-level Spanish course or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to expand students' conversational and comprehension skills in Spanish, through the viewing, analysis, and exploration of some of the most representative films produced in Spain and Latin America. In addition to in-class discussions, students will be expected to write film reviews, and write, act in, produce and tape short films that will be screened in the last week of class. Botta.

SPAN 397: Cultures in Contact in Medieval Spain (3). Prerequisite: SPAN 215 and 220 or permission of the instructor. Muslims, Jews, and Christians coexisted for eight-hundred years on the Iberian Peninsula. This course will examine texts (literary, historical, religious & philosophical) from the period prior to the arrival of the Arabs in 711, up to and beyond the expulsion of the Jews in 1492. The objective of the course will be to glean from the texts of these three cultures insights into how they understood and influenced each other. (HL, GE3) Bailey.

Theater (THTR)

THTR 180 & 180L: FS: Hardboiled L.A.: Film Noir and the City of Angels (3,0). Prerequisite: First-year students only. In this First-Year Seminar, we study some of the major classical films noirs of the 1940s and '50s (such as Double Indemnity and Kiss Me Deadly), specifically films that focus on Los Angeles, a city that is more often than not depicted as a city of corruption and dreams dashed and deferred. We also consider neo-Noirs (such as The Long Goodbye, Devil in a Blue Dress, and Blade Runner). The course examines how these recent films re-interpret the Noir tradition and how they grapple with the social and cultural forces at work within modern L.A., including gender, race, and globalization. Lab component for film screenings required. (HA) Reichek

THTR 181: FS: Experimental Theater (3). Prerequisite: First-year students only. This course explores the diverse experimental theater movements that mark the 20th century. Anti-realist styles such as symbolism, surrealism, theater of the absurd, and post-modern performance are studied for their rebellious approaches to acting, language, sound, gesture, story, setting, theater space, and audience. Through textual analysis and hands-on performance, students engage the artistic goals and cultural contexts shaping these various attempts to re-define theatrical art, culminating in the development of original student performance art. (HA) Jew

THTR 202: Theater in London (6). Open to all students by permission of the instructor. This course is an intensive exposure to English theater and the current performance season in London. In addition to a full schedule of theater attendance, the course includes a study of production techniques and representative styles and periods of English drama. Seminars with professional theater artists are also be offered. Students have ample opportunities to take advantage of the rich artistic, cultural and historical sites in and around London. Martinez

THTR 290: Seminar: Motion Picture Screenwriting (3). No prerequisites. This seminar presents modern writing for visual media. Included in this study is the story structure of film, the unique format for writing in the discipline and the elements of plot and character development. Students are divided into groups of three, instructive to the collaborative nature of the art, to write a 20-page screenplay, which includes creating a formal outline and a treatment of the story. Students also study classic films indicative of the evolution of the art of writing for film. Lab fee required. (HA, GE4a) Dean

THTR 397: Seminar: Scene Painting (3). Prerequisite: Three credits in theatre. This course is an exploration and application of the methods and materials used in painting and finishing scenery for the theater. The class covers both historical and current scene painting techniques as well as the tools and paints that have been developed to support those techniques. Outside projects are required. Lab fee required. (HA, GE4a) Collins

University Scholars (UNIV)

UNIV 201A: Humanities Seminar: The Science and Culture of the Nuclear Age (3). Open to all students, not just Scholars. This course entirely on campus. This seminar integrates nuclear science and technology with its effects on politics and popular culture of World War II and the Cold War. Each student selects a topic relating to a nuclear issue, obtains the instructors' approval, and prepares a term paper and presentation on the topic. The objective of the seminar is to show the relationships among science and technology, U.S. history, politics, and popular culture. (HU, GE4b) Michelmore, Settle

UNIV 201B: Humanities Seminar: German Film Adaptations (3). N.B. Students who took the Winter 2006 course LIT 295B, German Film Adaptations are not eligible for this course. This course examines both the theory and practice of film adaptation by studying how directors such as Wolfgang Petersen, Volker Schloendorff, and Werner Herzog treat and transform major literary works by Franz Kafka, Heinrich Boell, and Georg Büchner into moving pictures. (HL, GE3) Kramer

UNIV 201C: Humanities Seminar: Superheroes (3). This course explores the development of the superhero character, genre and form, focusing especially on pulp novels published before the first appearance of Superman in 1938. The cultural context, including Nietzsche ' s "Superman" philosophy and the larger eugenics movement, is also central. Students read, analyze, and interpret literary and cultural texts to produce their own analytical and creative writing. Likely works include: Superman Chronicles, Vol. 1, Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster; Batman Chronicles, Vol. 1, Bob Kane, Bill Finger; The Scarlet Pimpernel, Baroness Orczy; Tarzan of the Apes, Edgar Rice Burroughs; The Adventures of Jimmie Dale, Frank L.Packard; Gladiator, Philip Wylie; Doc Savage: Man of Bronze, Lester Dent; Essential Amazing Spider-Man, Vol. 1; Essential The Punisher, Vol. 1.; The Watchmen, Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons; and The Dark Knight, Frank Miller. (HL, GE3) Gavaler

Women's Studies (WST)

Courses for Spring 2009

The following courses approved for credit in Women's Studies will be offered during Spring 2009: WST 120: Introduction to Women's Studies; ENGL 261: Reading Gender; ENGL 380: 20th Century Poetry in Form; SOC 264: Work and Family; THTR 250 Women in Contemporary Theater. Students with an interest in completing the new minor in Women's and Gender Studies are strongly encouraged to take WST 120 in Spring 2009.

Please feel free to contact Professor Robin Le Blanc, acting head of the Women's Studies program with any further questions. womensstudies.wlu.edu/