WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY REGISTRATION
Changes to the 2007-2008 Catalog and Special Announcements for Winter Term 2008
(updated to )

For accurate and up-to-date information, please see "Recent Changes" and the course listing on the University Registrar's web page at http://registrar.wlu.edu/ .

by academic discipline:

Accounting French Philosophy
African-American Studies Freshman Seminars (FS) Physical Education 
Anthropology Geology Physics
Art  German Politics
Biology Greek  Portuguese
Business Administration History Poverty & Human Capability
Chemistry Interdepartmental  Psychology
Chinese Italian Public Speaking
Classics Japanese Religion
Computer Science Journalism & Mass Communication Russian
Dance Latin Russian Area Studies
East Asian studies Latin American and Caribbean Studies Sociology
East Asian Languages & Literatures Lit in Translation  Spanish
Economics Mathematics Theater
Education Medieval & Renaissance Studies University Scholars
Engineering Military Science/ROTC Women's Studies
English Music  
Environmental studies Neuroscience   

Accounting (ACCT)

African-American Studies (AFAM)

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 260 (3)—Conflicts in Eurasia: Globalization, New States, and Soviet Legacies. In this course, students learn how to apply anthropology and a wide range of other disciplinary techniques to understand and attempt to solve post-socialist problems. Students do independent research on issues relevant to their main areas of course work. We explore how ethnographic fieldwork and cultural theory provide key information about how people in Eurasia relate to daily conflicts through common past socialist experiences and new interactions with globalization, transnational movements, and the world market. Throughout the term, we discuss differences and similarities, advantages and disadvantages of various disciplinary approaches to key conflicts in the region. Topics include crime, the emerging marketplace, poverty, health, gender, and ethnic conflict. We study Eurasia via issues rather than geography, and we focus intensely on the transnational effects of wars in Chechnya and Afghanistan. The class reads material from anthropology and other disciplines and watches several documentaries. (SS4, GE6d) Goluboff.

ANTH 290 (3) - Grave Matters: On Death and Burial - topical description - When we shuffle off this mortal coil, what happens to our physical remains - our bodies? The answer to this question depends on how we died, and cultural attitudes regarding the dead. This course explores beliefs about the dead across time and space; the transformations our physical bodies undergo after death; how archaeologists investigate human remains to interpret past peoples; and how forensic scientists investigate human remains - especially those that died under mysterious circumstances. WARNING: This class includes graphic depictions of the deceased. Means

Art (ART)

ART 180 (3) -  Freshman Seminar: The Silk Road: Connecting East and West - topical description - As American as apple pie or fireworks on the Fourth of July? Think again. Much that we hold to be typically Western, in fact has its origins in Asia. Fireworks originated in China, and apples are believed to have come from the Caucasus. At the heart of this course is the Silk Road, a European term for the network of trade routes that brought silk, among other commodities such gunpowder, paper, porcelain and pasta, from Asia to the West, beginning more than 2,000 years ago. The Silk Road was always about a lot more than silk, however. This seminar will explore the various ways that the Silk Road, by camel caravan across central Asia and, later, by sailing ship using new maritime routes, facilitated exchanges of commodities and technologies, arts and ideas between China and the rest of the world for over two thousand years. We have been used to thinking of Asia in terms of its Westernization in the course of the last century. Examining new material, and some familiar material from new points of view, introduces a shift—from the Eurocentric perspective that underlies the worldview of most Americans—to a more global perspective on the world. Whatever your point of departure—whether an interest in economics and commerce, music or art, the worlds of ancient Rome or pre-modern Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia, or Buddhism and India, or China and, ultimately, Japan—this is a course that should pique your interest and broaden your horizons. (HA, GE4a) O'Mara.

ART 265 (3) - Digital Color Photography - revised course title and description - An introduction to the visual and technical principles of color photography, as applied in the digital realm. Color photography is explored through both film and digital formats. Students are introduced to techniques in photographic imaging and printmaking in the digital darkroom. (HA, GE4a) Bowden

ART 380 (3) - Seminar in Art History - Cancelled

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 111A (3) - Fundamentals of Biology: Disease Ecology - topical description - Corequisite: Biology 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. We explore microbiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution from the perspective of disease. We focus on why some diseases spread, some die out, and some become endemic within populations. We also examine the evolution of virulence and antibiotic resistance, and the effects of disease on human and wildlife populations. Examples to be studied in detail include Bird Flu, Human HIV/AIDS, Ebola, amphibian fungal disease, and Mad Cow Disease. (SL, GE5a when taken with Biology 113) Marsh

BIOL 111B (3) - Fundamentals of Biology: Adaptation and Biodiversity - topical description - Corequisite: Biology 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. An organism's niche reflects the sum of physiological adaptations to the environment. This course begins with physiology, and follows the ecological hierarchy through populations, communities, and ecosystems. We examine the genetic and evolutionary sources of biological diversity, biogeographical patterns, causes of extinction, and conservation strategies for preserving what remains. (SL, GE5a when taken with Biology 113) Hurd

BIOL 225 (4) - Plant Biology - revised description - Prerequisites: Biology 111 and 113 or permission of the instructor. An exploration of chemical warfare interactions between plants and their enemies. Topics include the biochemical, physiological, morphological, and molecular bases of these interactions as shaped by ecology and evolution. Students use modern laboratory techniques to test current hypotheses. Laboratory course. Alerding.

BIOL 295A (1) - Mammalian Reproductive Strategies - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. This seminar looks at the social and environmental influences on reproduction in mammals. We study a variety of related topics, such as social interactions and reproduction, metabolic fuels and reproduction, photoperiodic timing reproduction in seasonal breeders, and the role of pheromones in inhibiting and stimulating reproduction. I'Anson

BIOL 295B (1) - A Biologist's View of Creationism - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. What is creationism? How do biologists view creationism? Are science and religion necessarily at odds over the subject of evolution? These are some of the questions that are explored through discussion of two books: Pennock's Tower of Babel and Miller's Finding Darwin's God. Knox

BIOL 295C (1) - The Cancer Problem - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. An exploration of the nature of neoplastic disease and its epidemiological, biological and psychological correlates. Student presentations of selected cancer literature, discussion based learning and a term paper on a topic important to the student. Wielgus

Business Administration (BUS)

BUS 302 (3) - Seminar in Finance: Financial Derivatives - topical description - Prerequisite: BUS 221 or permission of the instructor. This class provides students with an overview of the characteristics and uses of financial derivatives. Derivatives are assets which derive their value from another asset such as a stocks or commodity. Options, futures, and swaps are examples of derivatives. Understanding of this material is critical to students planning to work in Finance after graduation. Schwartz

BUS 303 (3) - Seminar in Marketing: Marketing Research - topical description - Prerequisite: INTR 202 and BUS 211. This course is structured around a team market research project. Students learn how to define a marketing-management decision problem, derive research objectives, select research methods, design instruments for data collection, collect data, analyze the data using the SPSS statistical package, and report the results. Simmons

BUS 340 (3) - Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management. For Winter 2008, a limited number of Seniors will be admitted, provided they have completed Accounting 202 as a prerequisite. Pirkle

BUS 401A (1) - Entrepreneurs and Leaders - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A small group of students studies successful entrepreneurs from around the world, including access to an impressive set of entrepreneurs who visit campus. The class consists of lectures and discussions, with opportunities to meet with our guests outside the classroom. We average about one session per week; for scheduling purposes, class meetings are set at E on MWF to provide necessary flexibility in planning. Assignments include several short papers on entrepreneurs in the news, as well as a longer paper on a pertinent theme. This course does not count towards the Business Administration major. Pirkle

BUS 401B (1) - Study Abroad: Ireland Orientation - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Admission to this course is limited to students who are accepted into the BUS 390/391 Spring-Term course in Ireland. Dean

BUS 401C (1) - Study Abroad: Nicaragua Orientation - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Admission to this course is limited to students who are accepted into the BUS 390/391 Spring Term course in Ireland. Reiter

Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 295A (1) – Roots of Medicine - topical description - Not open to students with credit for Univ 201, Health and Healthcare in South Asia. Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 242. Medicine is one of the oldest subjects of human knowledge. This course considers briefly the highpoints of medical history in a variety of cultures and how these advances led to the diversity of healing arts still practiced today. In addition to modern biomedicine (as typified by the allopathic/osteopathic practices in the United States), this course examines how "alternative" medicines, such as Ayurveda and homeopathy, are used throughout the world. We analyze the legitimacy, usefulness, and coexistence of different approaches to healing with an eye toward the central question "What does it mean to be well?" Desjardins.

CHEM 295B (1) – Culinary Chemistry - topical description - Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 242. The chemical changes, described and discussed at the molecular level, associated with the cooking of food and food preparation, spoilage, and preservation. Pleva, France

Chinese (CHIN)

Classics (CLAS)

Computer Science (CSCI)

CSCI 295 (1) - C++ Programming - topical description - Prerequisite: Computer Science 209. Provides an introduction to the C and C++ programming languages. Knowledge of Java is assumed. Primary emphasis is on the concepts and structures needed for graphics and systems programming. Necaise

Dance (DANC)

East Asian Languages and Literatures (EALL)

East Asian Studies (EAS)

Economics (ECON)

ECON 295 (3) - Special Topics in Applied Microeconomics: Health Economics - topical description - Prerequisite: Economics 101 and sophomore standing. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of health economics within the context of the United States. The course provides an overview of the existing institutions and policies in the U.S. health-care system. We apply standard microeconomic tools, such as models of imperfect competition, to analyze how the current structure influences the allocation and distribution of health services. We also investigate potential health-care reforms involving issues such as medical malpractice, Medicare, Medicaid, the cost of prescription drugs, national health insurance, and markets for human organs. The course evaluates the impact of existing policies and proposed reforms on the economically disadvantaged. Students also consider the appropriate role of government in health-care provision given the potential of market failure and government failure. The course includes an optional service learning component that gives students direct experience with health-care services in Rockbridge County. Diette

ECON 296 (3) - Special Topics in International Economics: Economics of the Middle East - topical description - Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102 and sophomore standing. This course is the study of several topics related to the economies of Middle Eastern countries. Topics include but are not limited to the economic history of the region, economic growth, the oil industry and OPEC (The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries), Dutch disease, population and globalization. With focus on selected countries, the tools of economic analysis are applied to provide insight into the problems of the region. Students write a research paper on a topic and a country of their choice related to the course theme. Ghandi

ECON 395 (3) - Special Topics in Applied Microeconomics: Introduction to Game Theory - topical description - Prerequisites: Math 101 and Economics 210. Game theory is a collection of formal methods for analyzing strategic interactions. As such, it is a powerful tool for explaining behavioral phenomena studied in many disciplines including economics, political science, and even biology. This course focuses on topics in microeconomics. We introduce the important central notion of equilibrium, learn to analyze archetypal games such as the Prisoners' Dilemma, and study applications in auctions, bargaining, oligopoly, signaling, and mechanism design. Class time combines lectures, discussion and classroom experiments. Guse

Education (EDUC)

EDUC 305 (3) - Teaching Elementary Reading - newly offered course - Prerequisites:  Education 200 and admission to teacher education. Corequisite: Education 306. This course prepares students to teach reading in the elementary classroom.  Participants develop an understanding of the reading process, consider theories of reading instruction, examine current research in reading development, and investigate elements of a balanced literacy program.   Strategies for teaching word study, phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, and spelling are studied for each developmental reading stage.  Students also examine formal and informal diagnostic techniques and instructional procedures for dealing with various types of reading difficulties. Sigler. Winter

EDUC 306 (1) - Practicum: Teaching Elementary Reading - newly offered course - Corequisite: Education 305. Provides students with the opportunity to observe and practice the reading methods used in elementary education. Sigler

Engineering (ENGN)

English (ENGL)

ENGL 105A (3) - Composition and Literature: Hardboiled and Film Noir - topical description - An exploration of the 20th century's fascination with crime fiction through a study of short stories and novels by three of its finest American practitioners - Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and Patricia Highsmith - along with several classic film versions of their novels by such major directors as John Huston, Billy Wilder, and Alfred Hitchcock. The course begins with close study of the hardening in the 1920s of the high culture vs. mass culture dichotomy through a careful juxtaposition of T.S. Eliot's modernist poetry and Dorothy Sayers's popular crime fiction along with essays by both of these writers on canonical literature and popular crime fiction. We then turn to the American noir novels and films of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s and their self-conscious effort to challenge this opposition of high and mass culture with popular narratives marked by high artistic ambition. (FW, GE1) Adams

ENGL 105B (3) - Composition and Literature: Mysteries, Puzzles, and Conundrums - topical description - We concern ourselves with mysteries, not in the generic sense of stories about crime and detection, but mysteries of character, morality, religion, and art. Central to each of the works we read is some puzzle, secret, riddle, enigma, ambiguity, or complexity. (Sometimes the work itself is the mystery, a kind of hieroglyph.) Each work, in its own way, raises questions about the methods and the limitations of human discovery. (FW, GE1) Oliver

ENGL 105C (3) - Composition and Literature: I See Dead People - topical description - The course focuses on literary representations of spirits and the afterlife. Texts may include: Henry James, The Turn of the Screw; A. S. Byatt, The Conjugal Angel; W. P. Kinsella, Shoeless Joe; Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit; Thornton Wilder, Our Town; Toni Morrison, Beloved. (FW, GE1) Gavaler

ENGL 105D (3) - Composition and Literature: Imagining Childhood - topical description - Childhood has not always meant what we now think it means, and writers over the last two centuries have continually challenged and modified cultural assumptions about it as a unique stage of innocence and play. In this class we discuss a range of literary texts that have in some sense invented and continue to revise our ideas of childhood - in terms not only of childhood's conceptual relationship to innocence but also its strong, if counterintuitive, connection to more difficult topics, such as sexuality and death. Because this is a writing class, we use these readings and the ideas they spark to develop and deepen students' analytical writing skills. Texts include William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, Phillip Pullman's The Golden Compass, among many others. (FW, GE1) Matthews

ENGL 105E (3) - Composition and Literature: Faith, Doubt, and Identity - topical description - What is belief and how does it shape a person's selfhood? How does being a part of a religious community, or a variety of religious communities, shape one's identity? We explore these questions through fiction and autobiography about lives of faith (and doubt). Possible texts include Augustine's Confessions, often thought of as the first autobiography; selections from C.S. Lewis' Mere Christianity; Elie Wiesel's Night; Ron Hansen's Mariette in Ecstasy, a novel about a stigmatic nun; Adrienne Rich's "Split at the Root," an essay on Jewish feminist identity; James Wood's novel, The Book Against God, on a philosophy student's repudiation of his father's Christianity; and Leila Ahmed's A Border Passage, an autobiography by a contemporary Harvard Divinity School professor who grew up in an Egyptian Muslim family. (FW, GE1) Gertz

ENGL 105F (3) - Composition and Literature: Gossips and Cons - topical description - This course explores literary representations of two prominent social discourses: gossiping and conning. Through critical reading, collaborative learning, and argumentative writing, we explore diverse characterizations of the gossip and the con artist in a variety of genres and texts, ranging from Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing to F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. We analyze the various schemes and rhetorical strategies that gossips and cons employ in their texts to exert social influence, their understanding and manipulation of the status quo, their motivations and rewards, and their efforts upon both the individual and the larger community. To further our practice of sound argumentative writing, we juxtapose the discourses of gossip and con artistry with our own modes for persuading readers. In addition, we think critically about our personal susceptibility to the influences of the gossip and the con as well as our inclinations to (sometimes?) play their roles. (FW, GE1) Wall

ENGL 105G (3) - Composition and Literature: Wicked Women - topical description - This section begins with Chaucer's Wife of Bath and ends with recent essays on Hillary Clinton. We look at witchcraft, femme fatales and prostitutes as a way of considering literary approaches towards women and men's power and sexuality. The course is not for women only - for instance, our discussion of witchcraft and wizardry will run from Miller's The Crucible through excerpts from Harry Potter. (FW, GE1) Brodie

ENGL 105H (3) - Composition and Literature: Americans Abroad - topical description - Tourists, expatriates, soldiers, students, and business professionals - Americans travel, work, and live all over the world. In this course, we focus on fiction and non-fiction that describes the experiences of Americans abroad, including texts by Henry James, Jamaica Kincaid, and Tim O'Brien. What can these works tell us about the construction of cultural and national identities? What do they reveal about the position of the U.S. in a global context? What sorts of global and political matters, as well as personal concerns, are highlighted when one spends time abroad? In response to the texts and the issues they raise, students write a variety of essays. (FW, GE1) Hall

ENGL 232 (3) - The Novel - newly offered course

ENGL 292 (3) - Topics in British Literature: Adaptation x 2 - topical description - This course begins with two early classics of naturalist fiction by Emile Zola and Joseph Conrad before turning to a series of 20th-century crime fictions by writers from Agatha Christie and Raymond Chandler to Patricia Highsmith and Anthony Burgess, several of which have been adapted into important films two or more times by directors from Alfred Hitchcock and Rene Clair to Ridley Scott and Stanley Kubrick. Thus the course surveys several novels and films with attention to the relation between art and crime, theories of the novel and of film, problems of adaptation, and, especially, how the best film adaptations often radically reinterpret and recast the themes and interests of their original novels. (HL, GE3) Adams

ENGL 293A (3) - Topics in American Literature: Literature of the Gilded Age - topical description - This course investigates American literature written during the historical period that Mark Twain dubbed the Gilded Age (roughly 1865 to 1905). An explosive era of excesses and contradictions, the Gilded Age witnessed Reconstruction, the rise of the modern city, the closing of the frontier, and the celebration of unprecedented wealth. With the major literary developments of realism and naturalism in mind, we practice close reading of individual texts to see how diverse writers created complex, often conflicting representations of American experience and national identity. For instance, we may juxtapose Dreiser's Sister Carrie with L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (both published in 1900), the popular dime-novels of Horatio Alger with the conjure tales of Charles Chesnutt, and the intensely personal poetry of Emily Dickinson with the publicly censured novel The Awakening. Requirements include journal entries, analytical essays, an oral presentation, and exams. (HL, GE3) Wall

ENGL 293B (3) - Topics in American Literature: Explorations and Expeditions in American Literature This course treats the literature and visual artworks associated with some of the most famous explorers in nineteenth-century America: Lewis and Clark; John James Audubon; Ferdinand Hayden; Clarence King; John Wesley Powell; John Muir. Artists will include George Catlin, Thomas Moran, Frederic Church, Timothy O'Sullivan, and Henry Jackson. This course counts for general education literature and for the Environmental Studies program humanities requirement. (HL, GE3) Warren

ENGL 299A (3) - Seminar for Prospective Majors: For Love or Money: Renaissance Drama in Performance - topical description - This seminar for prospective majors juxtaposes well-known works by Shakespeare with more unfamiliar masterpieces by his contemporaries, including Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, and Ford. While our discussions will be wide-ranging, one of our recurring themes will be the conjunction of economic and religious language with romantic love in early modern drama. We will also be mindful of what separates plays from novels: the fact that they are performed. The seminar's reading list is designed around the Renaissance season of Staunton's American Shakespeare Center, which offers us the rare opportunity to see live productions of early modern drama in our own backyard. The performance focus of the course will also entail explorations of the production history of the plays as well as the economics of playing in Shakespeare's day and our own. (HL, GE3) Pickett

ENGL 299B (3) - Seminar for Prospective Majors: Justice and the Law - topical description -  critical shift in Western beliefs about what could achieve justice in society occurred from the late medieval to the early modern period. While medieval English society had its laws, it also believed that the pledged word and loyalty should govern social, political, and economic relations and that justice was a virtue of character. By contrast, Tudor England, especially its leaders educated as humanists, saw law as a tool to reform systemic injustices and to regulate all forms of human relations. We explore this shift by contrasting, first, two works about making just judgments: Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur, a nostalgic late medieval romance celebrating the just character of some of King Arthur's knights in their role as "enforcers," and Shakespeare's Measure for Measure, in which a puritanical regent attempts to enforce strictly a law against fornication. Then we examine how Piers Plowman (read in translation) searches for the means to reform entrenched economic and legal injustice while Sir Thomas More's Utopia imagines a country in which law achieves strict equality in politics, in labor, in standard of living, and in sexual relations. Throughout the seminar we study the types of English law and the medieval concepts of law that have shaped American law. (HL, GE3) Craun

ENGL 380 (3) - Advanced Seminar: Trial, Torture, and the Truth: Writing in Early Modern England - topical description - The 16th century was an extraordinary period in English history not least because it witnessed the Reformation, a movement whose seismic changes in religious and political identity profoundly affected literature. Some of the most dramatic experiences happened in the courtroom - the ecclesiastical courtroom, that is. Academics and lay persons, both women and men, came before heresy interrogators and either defended their dissenting views or acquiesced to the authorities by abjuring. Several of them wrote about their experiences. This course studies writing about heresy trial in England (both Protestant and Catholic), examining important trial narratives from the period as well as historical work on the process of heresy trial itself. We consider how trial narratives function as autobiography and sermon, and how they establish public authority. As a way of understanding the environment in which writing about trial and belief took place, we also study contemporary work on trauma and memory as well as prison writing (especially South African). Besides being of interest to English majors, this course should appeal to students of History, Sociology, Religion, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Women's Studies, and Politics. (HL, GE3) Gertz

ENGL 380A (3) - Advanced Seminar: The Romantic Lyric from Newton to Darwin - Cancelled

ENGL 413A (3) - Senior Research and Writing: Literary Passing - topical description - This seminar focuses on literary representations of 'passing': people concealing their 'real' identity in order to live as a different gender, race, or sexuality. Women living as men, lesbians living as wives, African-Americans living as whites: what do representations of such characters teach us about the constructedness of gender, race, and sexuality - about the 'realness' of 'natural' identities? How do given literary elements (e.g., dramatic irony, unreliable narration, plot suspense, particular metaphors) structure representations of passing? Could we say passing has a literary history? We begin our approach to such questions with a focus on the professor's areas of expertise and interest: 18th-century representations of gender crossing and sexual masquerade. We then read examples of racial and sexual passing in more contemporary literature. Throughout, we also read theory and criticism analyzing the ways various literary texts have taken up the question of people manipulating the categories of race, sex, and gender in order to inhabit social positions other than the ones conventionally assigned to them. In their independent research, students are encouraged to consider representations of passing in literary periods and genres of particular interest to them. Braunschneider

ENGL 413B (3) - Senior Research and Writing: Yeats, Gregory, and the Irish Literary Revival - topical description - This course examines the major modernist movement termed the "Irish Revival," by focusing on its two most important figures: the poet W.B. Yeats and the playwright, folklorist, and cultural critic Lady Gregory. We focus on the twin careers of these two figures, how they intertwined, and their crucial work in creating the Abbey Theater, transcribing Irish mythology, and giving expression to the key elements in Irish political freedom in the early 20th century. Methodologies include biographical criticism, genre criticism, history of the theater, politics and literature, and issues of myth, philosophy, and religion. Conner

ENGL 413C (3) - Senior Research and Writing: Studying Literature in Action - topical description - Explores the impact of literature on readers using empirical methods as well as introspection and traditional literary analysis. Shared theoretical readings augment individual directed readings in poetry, narrative fiction, drama, or children's literature, depending on the student's area of expertise. The dynamic process of literary composition is studied by reading online email novels, blog fiction, and hypertexts. A service learning option involving work with young readers through community schools or libraries is a possibility. Students also assist Professor Keen in her research on emotional responses to reading, beginning with a discussion of the newly published Empathy and the Novel. Keen

ENGL 413D (3) - Senior Research and Writing: Cultural Conflicts in the American West - topical description - n this section, we study a few key texts about the American West and then see where each student wants to go. There are many cultural conflicts from which to choose, and many wonderful texts written about those conflicts in virtually every genre. We figure out how to study these conflicts and to each write in stages a convincing long paper explicating one of them in depth, to be shared all along the way with the rest of us. Among the Western groups in conflict are Native Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and white Europeans from many different backgrounds, all fighting for their land, their economic livelihood, their culture, their families, their names, their ethnic identities, and virtually everything else human beings can fight for. Although our primary texts is literature, students who take this section also explore some of the historical and political manifestations of these conflicts, and grapple with the challenges of resolving them. Smout

Environmental Studies (ENV)

ENV 295 (3) - Remote Sensing and Environmental Risk - topical description - This course examines the use of radar-based remote sensing to detect environmental problems and support the remediation of environmental problems. Specific examples are drawn from the petroleum and natural-gas sectors, with case studies from the Brazilian coast, the Brazilian Amazon, and the Gulf of Mexico. The course meets for only the first six weeks of the semester, for six hours per week. The course is taught by one of the world's experts in this area, Professor Fernando Pellon de Miranda of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and Petrobras. Pellon de Miranda

French (FREN)

FREN 341 (3) - La France de l'Ancien Régime: La femme et l'écriture au 18ème siècle - topical description - Not open to those also registered in FREN 397. Prerequisite: French 273 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. This course focuses primarily on the writings of women in the age of enlightenment. However, some texts written by men about women are included as well. Of particular interest are representative genres and issues which galvanized women. We study literary as well as anthropological texts that expose not only the status of and discourse on women in 18th-century France but also women's perception of their status and role in a wider socio-cultural and political context. All class related work is conducted in French. (HL, GE3) Kamara

FREN 397 (3) - Séminaire avancé: La femme et l'écriture au 18ème siècle - topical description - Not open to those also registered in FREN 341. Prerequisite: Three courses at the 300 level or by permission of the instructor. This course focuses primarily on the writings of women in the age of enlightenment. However, some texts written by men about women are included as well. Of particular interest are representative genres and issues which galvanized women. We study literary as well as anthropological texts that expose not only the status of and discourse on women in 18th-century France but also women's perception of their status and role in a wider socio-cultural and political context. All class related work is conducted in French. Essays are written on the core texts studied as well as a final research paper on the general place of women in 18th-century society in general, and their contribution to the "Republic of letters" in particular. (HL, GE3) Kamara

Freshman Seminars (various disciplines, title has FS:)

ART 180 (3) -  Freshman Seminar: The Silk Road: Connecting East and West - topical description - As American as apple pie or fireworks on the Fourth of July? Think again. Much that we hold to be typically Western, in fact has its origins in Asia. Fireworks originated in China, and apples are believed to have come from the Caucasus. At the heart of this course is the Silk Road, a European term for the network of trade routes that brought silk, among other commodities such gunpowder, paper, porcelain and pasta, from Asia to the West, beginning more than 2,000 years ago. The Silk Road was always about a lot more than silk, however. This seminar will explore the various ways that the Silk Road, by camel caravan across central Asia and, later, by sailing ship using new maritime routes, facilitated exchanges of commodities and technologies, arts and ideas between China and the rest of the world for over two thousand years. We have been used to thinking of Asia in terms of its Westernization in the course of the last century. Examining new material, and some familiar material from new points of view, introduces a shift—from the Eurocentric perspective that underlies the worldview of most Americans—to a more global perspective on the world. Whatever your point of departure—whether an interest in economics and commerce, music or art, the worlds of ancient Rome or pre-modern Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia, or Buddhism and India, or China and, ultimately, Japan—this is a course that should pique your interest and broaden your horizons. (HA, GE4a) O'Mara.

Geology (GEOL)

GEOL 197 (3) - Weather and Climate -  topical description - A survey of weather and climate, including the physical properties of air, earth-sun relationships, planetary circulation, storms, weather forecasting and human-climate interactions. (SC, GE5c) Szramek

GEOL 335 (3) - Petroleum Geology and Geophysics - newly offered course - Prerequisites: Geology 100 or 101 and permission of instructor. A survey of the theory and practice of petroleum geology and geophysics. Topics covered include the nature and origin of petroleum, a study of where oil and gas accumulate from the perspective of basin analysis, and the basic principles of reflection seismology and petrophysics. The key petroleum system elements of charge, seal, reservoir, and structure are studied within the context of how a geologist or geophysicist goes about exploring for and developing petroleum accumulations. Emphasis is placed on the use of industry software and data to analyze geologic features, deposits, and basins that are relevant to petroleum exploration and production. Connors

German (GERM)

Greek (GR)

GR 395 (3) - Topics in Greek Literature: The Greek Novel - topical description  - In this course, students read a classic of western literature in the original Greek, Longus' Daphnis and Chloe. This rich work is one of the five great "ideal" Greek novels. The two main goals of the course are 1) to gain a detailed knowledge of this novel by attempting to read the whole work in Greek, and 2) to improve the student's grasp of Greek vocabulary and grammar in general. At the same time, the course addresses the larger structure of the Greek Novel as a genre. (HL, GE3) Johnson

History (HIST)

HIST 195 01 (3) - Islam from 1500 - topical description - On the eve of Modernity, the Islamic World had come to encompass a vast diversity of ethnic, cultural, religious, and political traditions. Though each region had carved out a unique place in the world, a number of shared historical experiences and institutions continued to bolster the ideal of a single Muslim community and worldview. This course traces the emergence of the early modern "gunpowder empires" (the Ottoman Empire, Safavid Iran, and Mughal India) as centralizing states; the spread of Islamic religious and political practices in Africa and Asia; the confrontation between the Islamic World and Europe during Ottoman expansion and then European colonial expansion; and the evolution of new political, cultural, and intellectual movements as Muslim nations gained independence in the 20th and 21st centuries and began to participate in the increasing pace of globalization. (HU, GE4b) Hatcher

HIST 329A-01 (3) - Nazism and the Third Reich - topical description - Common readings introduce students to some of the most lively debates among scholars about the causes of the failure of democracy in the Weimar Republic, the mentality of Nazi leaders and followers, the nature of the regime created by the Nazis in 1933, the impact of the Third Reich on the position of women in German society, and the degree to which the German people supported this regime's policies of war and racial persecution. Students develop a research topic related to one of these debates for analysis in a substantial research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources. (HU, GE4b) Patch

HIST 329B (3) - Gender and Crime - topical description - This course focuses on criminal trials from early modern Europe (ca. 1400-1700) that brought men and women into conflict with each other, or which challenged contemporary notions of gender identities and roles. These proceedings provide a particularly useful window onto gender relations and identities as they present us, in all cases, with individuals who transgressed, disrupted, or otherwise threatened contemporary expectations of how men and women should behave. Through exploring these transgressive moments, we define what these expectations were, and how (both men and especially women) could challenge the roles prescribed for them by an apparently patriarchal society (HU, GE4b) Baker

HIST 336 (3) - Environmental History of Latin America - newly offered course - Analysis of diverse people's historical interactions with Latin American environments to show how people created environments and how nature affected human history. Probes social, spiritual, economic, political, and intellectual forces influencing human-environment relations over time. Delves into many geographical areas and themes, including Amazon rainforests, Andean farms, Patagonian peaks, the Panama Canal, Costa Rican national parks, and Caribbean sugar plantations, as well as US coffee shops, supermarkets, and fast food chains. (HU, GE4b) Carey

HIST 380 01 (3) - Japan to 1800: Shamans-Samurai - cancelled

HIST 381 01 (3) - Japan in World War II - cancelled

HIST 389 01 (3) - Visions of Japan's Empire in East Asia: 19th-Century Origins through World War II - topical description - Japan's19th-century imperial system ensured its status as the only major non-western "great power" in the first half of the 20th century. Within the space of its fifty years of existence (1895-1945), imperial Japan underwent radical political, social, and cultural transformations that had equally profound effects on East Asian and world history, culminating in World War II. The course explores these distinctive transformations, which constitute Japan's theory and practice of political and cultural imperialism, through an analysis of text and image for the construction of a website by the class. (HU, GE4b) Bello

Interdepartmental (INTR)

Italian (ITAL)

Japanese (JAPN)

Journalism (JOUR)

JOUR 295A (3) - Sports Journalism - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A seminar examining reporting and writing methods and techniques used by working journalists who cover sports in local, regional, national, and international arenas in the converged world. In addition, students read and analyze several longer pieces by working journalists. An extensive writing component is included. de Maria

JOUR 295B (3) - Race, Religion and Media - topical description -This course covers media literacy and critical theory. It introduces students to the myriad ethnic cultures and religions in the U.S. and examines how media depict those cultures and religions. Students study how racial, ethnic, and religious stereotypes shape institutional media, and how media inclusion and exclusion of cultural and ethnic "others" influence the broader culture. Class requirements include mandatory attendance and participation, experiential exercises, readings, group and individual presentations, and a research paper. Mitchell

JOUR 296 (3) - Topics in News Media History: Discovering America’s Early Newspapers - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This seminar-style course allows students to take advantage of a valuable collection of historical newspapers recently donated to W&L’s Special Collections by Fred Farrar ’41. It is designed to engage interested students, not just journalism majors, in thinking historically and doing research using very old newspapers as primary sources. Cumming

Latin (LATN)

LATN 395A (3) - The City of Rome in Latin Literature - topical description - Prerequisite: Latin 301 or equivalent. We examine the monuments, topography, and the urban fabric of Rome as presented in Latin literature. The Augustan period looms large as a time of great urban renewal that also places great emphasis on the past, and on the foundation of Rome in particular. This course prepares students intending to travel to Italy this spring with CLAS 288 but is open to everyone. Readings come from a variety of authors and genres including Ovid, Vergil, Propertius, Juvenal, and Augustus himself. You are eligible to take this course if you have taken Latin 395 course previously, with a different topic. (HL, GE3) Benefiel

LATN 395B (3) - Topics in Advanced Latin Literature: Roman Satire - topical description - Prerequisite: Latin 301 or equivalent. This course examines the elusive genre of Roman Satire by reading the poetry of Horace, Persius, and Juvenal. Our primary objective is to read carefully and critically, using the text as a point of departure for some of the fascinating questions that surround the genre: What is Roman Satire and what is its place in Latin literature? How does it differ from contemporary satire or what is broadly thought of as satirical literature? What makes Roman Satire funny, if it is indeed funny? Is Satire dangerous or subversive? Is it seriously critical or serious at all? What if we identify with the object of the satire? Does satire make you a better person? All of these questions and undoubtedly more are broached. (HL, GE3) Walker

Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)

Literature in Translation (LIT)

Literature in Translation 223 (3) - Food and Tea in Japan - topical description - This seminar explores the distinct theme of food and tea in Japanese culture and literature. We examine three broad categories throughout the term; kaiseki, bento, and common fare. In addition to three hours of lecture, this unique course requires a "cultural lab" where students master the rudimentary procedure of the tea ceremony in the new Japanese tea room in the Watson Pavilion. (HL, GE3) Ikeda

Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 401A (1) - Introduction to Actuarial Science - topical description - Pass/Fail only. This course prepares students for either Exam P (Probability) or Exam FM (Financial Mathematics), required for the actuarial career. Dresden

MATH 401B (1) - Logic Puzzles and Problem Solving - topical description  - Pass/Fail only. Topics covered include predicate logic, truth tables, incompleteness, and undecidability. Dresden

Medieval and Renaissance Studies (MRST)

Military Science (MS)

Music (MUS)

MUS 118 (1) – Bentley Musical Rehearsals - newly offered course - Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course is designed for rehearsal of music in preparation for the annual Bentley Musical. Only those cast in the production may enroll. Rehearsals are scheduled subject to the availability of the cast and instructor. While some cast members rehearse during the day, most should expect evening and weekend rehearsals. An audition is required on dates announced by the Theater and Music Departments. Myers. Note: Counts toward the limits of eight credits in ensemble courses (Music 108-118).

MUS 195 (1) - Topics in Sound Technology: Pro Tools - newly offered course, topical description - Students learn the basic principles needed to complete a Pro Tools project, from initial setup to mixdown. Projects may involve recording of live instruments, MIDI sequencing of software synthesizers, or audio looping. This class provides practical examples and frequent hands-on assignments designed to teach recording, editing, and mixing on a basic level. At the end of the course, students have an opportunity to take the Digidesign Pro Tools 101 Certification Exam. Graham Spice

MUS 295 (3) - Topics in Music: Popular Music in America Since 1945 - newly offered course, topical description - Selected studies in music with a focus on history and culture, non-classical genres, ethnomusicological topics, or performance. May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different. The topic for Winter 2008: The principle perspective of the class addresses popular music as an audible text, as an artifact of and contributor to popular music culture of the mid to late 20th century. At the heart of popular-music studies is the need to know 'Who we are?' and perhaps more importantly, 'Why we are?' In this context, music is the lens through which students cross-examine a host of momentous social and historic figures and events. In so doing, it opens up parallel discussion on critical American issues such as the relative role of politics, race, gender, technology, and religious diversity. (HA, GE4a) Scarborough

Neuroscience (NEUR)

NEUR/PSYC 395 (3) - Neuropharmacology - topical description - Prerequisites: PSYC 111 or NEUR 120 and permission of instructor. This course combines lecture and seminar elements to explore the physiological bases for drug action in the nervous system, with emphasis on cellular mechanisms. The course begins with an overview of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and neurotransmitter systems; and then proceeds to examinations of major psychoactive drug classes, with reference to recent literature on their mechanisms of action. Finally, current theories to account for compulsive drug misuse are discussed. The role of neuropharmacology in the growth of our understanding of normal neurochemical function is stressed throughout. R. Stewart

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 195 (3) - Philosophy of the Family - topical description - This course considers philosophical issues raised by family as a social institution and as a legal institution.  Topics addressed may include the social and personal purposes served by the institution of family, the nature of relationships between family members, the various forms that family can take, the scope of family privacy or autonomy, and how family obligations, mutual support and interdependency affect individual members of families. (HU, GE4c) Bell

PHIL 395 (3) - Advanced Seminar: African-American Philosophy - revised course description - Not open to students who took PHIL 195 in Winter 2007.After an introduction to the subject (consisting of both classic and contemporary selections by authors such as Sojourner Truth, DuBois, King, Cornell West, bell hooks, and James Baldwin), we move to an in-depth discussion of two central topics in African-American philosophy, namely, political thought and feminism. This investigation is conducted through a close engagement with three contemporary texts: Inclusive Feminism: A Third Theory of Women's Commonality (Zack); We Who are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity (Shelby); and White Guilt: How Blacks and Whites Together Destroyed the Promise of the Civil Rights Era. While the course is open to all students, it is designed for those with some training in philosophy. In addition, the course should appeal to students in women's studies, politics, and history. (HU, GE 4c) Jackson

Physical Education (PE)

Physical Education - IMPORTANT -- Read the instructions for PE registration at
registrar.wlu.edu/registration/regpe.htm


and the departmental information at
athletics.wlu.edu/physical_education/

Students may express a preference for up to three skills courses as part of web registration. These preferences will be examined after the academic schedule is set and, if open and not in conflict with the academic courses, one may be placed in the schedule. Changes or additional sections may still be handled during the drop/add period.

The following Physical Education ‑ courses have an additional charge, billed to the student's account after registration: PE 130 Dance Conditioning; PE 151 Golf; PE 170 Horsemanship; PE 178 Ballet; PE 179 Modern Dance; PE 304 First Aid/CPR.

Physics (PHYS)

Politics (POL)

POL 295A (3) - Seminar on International Security - topical description - The objective of this seminar is to familiarize students with major theoretical approaches to international security problems. We debate the causes of interstate war, civil war, nationalist conflict, genocide and terrorism; we also ponder various justifications for waging war, and also for intervention in the affairs of other states. Our discussion of these theoretical approaches is grounded in historical and current case studies: e.g. World Wars I and II, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, Yugoslavia, Somalia, Israel-Palestine, the Gulf Wars, the war on terror etc. (SS2) Zarakol

POL 295B (3) - Seminar on Islam and Politics - topical description - This course provides a broad and thorough introduction to the contemporary global "Islamic resurgence." Themes treated include: religion, politics and society; Islamic revival and reform; nationalism; the modern state; contemporary politics; and terrorism. Particular attention is given to the challenge of political Islam and to its radical and extremist manifestations past and present. The worldview and tactics of selected contemporary terrorist organizations are investigated. (SS2) Kiracofe

POL/SOC 376A (3) - Survey Data Analysis: Local. This course is designed as a group research project. Students select a topic, prepare a list of hypotheses, select indicators, construct a questionnaire, conduct interviews, analyze data, and write research reports. Jasiewicz

POL/SOC 376B (3) - Survey Data Analysis: Secondary. This course is devoted to secondary analysis of survey data. Working on a subject of their choice, students will learn how to formulate research hypotheses, test hypotheses through uni-, bi-, and multi-variate analyses (utilizing appropriate statistical packages such as SPSS for Windows), and write research reports. Jasiewicz

POL 396 (3) - Seminar in Political Philosophy: Political Theology, Political Philosophy, and Political Science - topical description - The European Enlightenment (of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries) tried to rid politics of theological and philosophical entanglements by securing our political self-understanding on the firm foundation of science. But as the horrors of 9/11 poignantly remind us, we still await the "Twilight of the Idols." This course examines the persistence of metaphysical claims in the age of science, the pressure of those claims on politics, asking along the way whether a post-metaphysical political science is possible and desirable. We do so by reading Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin on the relationship between and among theology, philosophy, and political science. We then turn to Saul Bellow's novel, Ravelstein (a story of the clash between reason and Revelation) loosely based on the life of one of the arch-Straussians, Allan Bloom (author of Closing of the American Mind). We conclude with a comparison between the works of two noted political theorists, Mark Lilla's The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West, and Charles Taylor's A Secular Age. (SS2) Velásquez

Portuguese (PORT)

Poverty and Human Capability (POV)

Students interested in Poverty and Human Capability Studies should plan to take Interdepartmental 101 (3), Introduction to Poverty and Human Capability, in the spring. This course meets the requirement for credits (but not for one of the two areas) under GE 4. A list of courses from other departments that qualify for the Poverty and Human Capability Studies transcript recognition appear on the program Web site: http://shepherd.wlu.edu/ .

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC/NEUR 395 (3) - Neuropharmacology - topical description - Prerequisites: PSYC 111 or NEUR 120 and permission of instructor. This course combines lecture and seminar elements to explore the physiological bases for drug action in the nervous system, with emphasis on cellular mechanisms. The course begins with an overview of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and neurotransmitter systems; and then proceeds to examinations of major psychoactive drug classes, with reference to recent literature on their mechanisms of action. Finally, current theories to account for compulsive drug misuse are discussed. The role of neuropharmacology in the growth of our understanding of normal neurochemical function is stressed throughout. R. Stewart

Public Speaking (PSPK)

Religion (REL)

REL 295 (3) - Social Sciences and Religion - topical description - Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructors. This course examines classical and contemporary literature in the social scientific analyses of religion, including anthropology, sociology, and psychology. The class begins with an examination of fundamental ontological and epistemological debates regarding the nature and goals of social scientific inquiry and continues with a relating of the alternative positions taken in these debates to specific approaches employed by social scientists -- including materialist, functionalist, and phenomenological -- and their implications for understanding such phenomena as the origin of religion and its psychological and social functions. Finally, implications for truth claims concerning religion and social science are addressed. The course is designed as a seminar with extensive student participation. (HU, GE4d) Markowitz and White

Russian (RUSS)

Russian Area Studies (RAS)

Sociology (SOC)

SOC/POL 376A (3) - Survey Data Analysis: Local. This course is designed as a group research project. Students select a topic, prepare a list of hypotheses, select indicators, construct a questionnaire, conduct interviews, analyze data, and write research reports. Jasiewicz 

SOC/POL 376B (3) - Survey Data Analysis: Secondary. This course is devoted to secondary analysis of survey data. Working on a subject of their choice, students will learn how to formulate research hypotheses, test hypotheses through uni-, bi- and multi-variate analyses (utilizing appropriate statistical packages such as SPSS for Windows), and write research reports. Jasiewicz

Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 396 (3) - Past, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Argentinas Cultural Products - topical description - Prerequisites: At least six credits of 300-level of Spanish or permission of the instructor. The seminar explores how the legacy of the past political violence is narrated, transmitted, rearticulated and performed in dramatic and literary texts, films, and sites of memories. Literary texts are complemented by readings on aesthetic debates, theory, and key pieces of criticism connected to recent discussions around the memory boom in post-authoritarian periods. Representative authors include: Walsh, Mercado, Valenzuela, Pavlovsky, Bertuccio and Carri, among others. (HL, GE3) Botta

Theater (THTR)

University Scholars (UNIV)

University Scholars 203 (3) - Science, Politics and the International Response to Weapons of Mass Destruction -  topical description - This team-taught course addresses the science, technology and political issues associated with the proliferation of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. Students study scientific/technological aspects of the acquisition and use of modern weapons of mass destruction and the issues surrounding the weapons programs of Iran, North Korea, India, and Pakistan. The effectiveness of nonproliferation treaties and policies are reviewed and consideration is given to new national and international initiatives to reduce or control the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Writing intensive course. University Scholars seeking to fulfill the science seminar requirement may petition the director for permission to count this seminar as UNIV 202. (GE6 as credits but not as one of the two areas) Settle and Strong

Women's Studies (WST)

Women's Studies: Students interested in Women's Studies should plan to take Interdepartmental 120 (3), Introduction to Women's Studies and Feminist Theory, in the spring. This course now meets the requirement for credits (but not for one of the two areas) under GE 4. A list of spring-term courses from other departments that qualify for Women's Studies credits appear on the program Web site: http://womensstudies.wlu.edu/ .

WST 120 (3) - Introduction to Women's Studies and Feminist Theory -  Cancelled