WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY REGISTRATION
Changes to the 2007-2008 Catalog and Special Announcements for Fall Term 2007
(updated to )

For accurate and up-to-date information, please see "Recent Changes" and the course listing on the University Registrar's web page at http://registrar.wlu.edu/ .

by academic discipline:

Accounting Environmental studies Neuroscience
African-American Studies French Philosophy
Anthropology Freshman Seminars (FS) Physical Education
Art  Geology Physics
Biology German Politics
Business Administration History Portuguese
Chemistry Interdepartmental  Poverty & Human Capability
Chinese Italian Psychology
Classics Japanese Public Speaking
Computer Science Journalism & Mass Communication Religion
Dance Latin Russian
East Asian studies Latin American and Caribbean Studies Russian Area Studies
East Asian Languages & Literatures Lit in Translation  Sociology 
Economics Mathematics Spanish
Education Medieval & Renaissance Studies Theater
Engineering Military Science/ROTC University Scholars
English  Music Women's Studies

Accounting (ACCT)

African-American Studies (AFAM)

Anthropology (ANTH)

Anthropology 290A (3) - Childhood - topical description - This course explores the experience of childhood cross culturally. It investigates how different societies conceptualize and engage with the fetus, birth, babies, toddlers, children, and adolescents. It also addresses issues such as discipline, emotion, feeding, and education. Special attention is given to the effects of war, poverty, social inequality, violence, and disease on children. Goluboff

Anthropology 290B (3) - Grave Matters: On Death and Burial - topical description - When we shuffle off this mortal coil, what happens to our physical remains - our bodies? The answer to this question depends on how we died, and cultural attitudes regarding the dead. This course explores beliefs about the dead across time and space; the transformations our physical bodies undergo after death; how archaeologists investigate human remains to interpret past peoples; and how forensic scientists investigate human remains - especially those that died under mysterious circumstances. WARNING: This class includes graphic depictions of the deceased. Means

Art (ART)

Art 180 (3) – Freshman Seminar: Visual Culture – An introduction to contemporary image culture and the constant flow of images in daily life.  The course examines cross-disciplinary approaches to making and reading images, including visual art, popular and underground visual culture, media culture, medical and scientific imaging, and consumer culture.  In addition to exploring how visual culture works, the course introduces the critical theories that underlie its interpretation. (HA) Ryan

Art 295 (3)Topics in Printmaking, Relief Printmaking  - topical description - Prerequisite: Art 121 Students learn the art of relief printmaking technique through demonstrations, project assignments and critique.  In addition to simple relief techniques such as collography, we will explore woodcut, wood engraving and linocut.   Color reduction prints and multi block color prints are also covered.   An emphasis is placed on the basic tenets of drawing and design,  the development of imagery and the conceptual content of prints.  Lab fee required.  (HA, GE4a)  Beavers

Biology (BIOL)


Biology 111A (3) - Fundamentals of Biology: The Human Genome - topical description - Corequisite: Biology 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. One of the most stunning achievements of modern science was the publication of the complete human genome. We will examine the foundations of molecular genetics, the science behind the Human Genome Project, and how genomic information is changing life sciences and our understanding of health and medicine. (SL or GE5A with Biology 113
) Cabe

Biology 111B (3) - Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Diversity - topical description - Corequisite: Biology 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Where did it come from and where is it going? This course focuses on evolution, extinction, and the conservation of biodiversity. We examine the genetic and evolutionary sources of biological diversity, biogeographical patterns, causes of extinction, and conservation strategies for preserving what remains. (SL or GE5A with Biology 113) Knox

Biology 111C (3) - Fundamentals of Biology: Communication from Cell to Organisms - topical description - Corequisite: Biology 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. We discuss the issues of communication of a cell with its external environment beginning with the single-celled organism. Our discussion moves on to a consideration of cell size and evolution of multicellular organisms. Multicellular forms of communication are introduced and their role in maintaining a stable environment for the individual cells of the whole organism is studied. (SL or GE5A with Biology 113) I'Anson

Biology 111D (3) - Fundamentals of Biology: Homeostasis and Human Physiology - topical description - Corequisite: Biology 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Homeostasis, the maintenance of the steady state, is a unifying principle which underlies biological functioning at every level. We explore the centrality of homeostasis in five body systems: nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory and urinary. (SL or GE5A with Biology 113) Wielgus

Biology 295A (1) - Biology of Homosexuality - topical description - Recent political controversy has focused on the origins and maintenance of homosexual behavior in humans. In this course, we explore the biological literature on sexual orientation. We address questions such as: What is the evidence for a genetic basis of homosexuality? How could homosexuality be maintained by natural selection? How common is homosexual behavior among non-human primates and other animals? Class meetings are based on student presentations and paper discussions. Marsh

Biology 295B (1) - History of Medicine - topical description - Students present seminars and written reports on topics on the historical aspects of medicine, specifically the various infectious diseases. Simurda

Business Administration (BUS)

Business Administration 195 (3) - Art in Business - topical description - This course is an investigation of the multiple roles that art and design play in the business world, covering all key areas of marketing communications. Among topics studied are the art and design elements of the logo; branding, packaging, and advertising; and the retail arena. Attention is focused on monetary allocations for the various methods of design and advertising; selected case studies; and aesthetic and psychological issues, past and present. MacDonald

Business Administration 196 (0) - Williams Investment Society - newly offered course - Prerequisite: Permission of the department head. This cocurricular educational student organization manages a portion of Washington and Lee's endowment. Students meet in formal and informal sessions conducted by faculty advisers and attend presentations made by outside speakers hosted by the Williams School. The experiential learning that occurs in this setting is grounded in fields such as accounting, economics, and finance as well the practice of investments and banking. Culpepper, Hoover, Schwartz

Business Administration 401 (1) - Entrepreneurial Leadership - topical description - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A small group of students studies successful entrepreneurs from around the world, including access to an impressive set of entrepreneurs who visit campus. The class consists of lectures and discussions, with opportunities to meet with our guests outside the classroom. We average about one session per week; for scheduling purposes, class meetings are set at EF on MWF to provide necessary flexibility in planning. Assignments include several short papers on entrepreneurs in the news, as well as a longer paper on a pertinent theme. This course does not count towards the Business Administration major. Pirkle

Chemistry (CHEM)

Chemistry 196 (3) - Nuclear Power: Energy and the Environment - newly offered course - This course examines the role of nuclear power as a current and future source of energy. Topics include introduction to science and technology of nuclear reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear waste, the history of nuclear power generation in the U.S. and other nations, economic, legal, and environmental issues, the risks associated with proliferation of nuclear weapons and terrorist attacks, and a comparison of nuclear power with other sources of energy. (SC, GE5c) Settle

Chinese (CHIN)

Classics (CLAS)

Computer Science (CSCI)

Dance (DANC)

Dance 130 (3) - Contemporary Dance Observation and Analysis - newly offered course - Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. The observation and analysis of live and recorded contemporary dance focusing on the work of emerging and established choreographers. Exploration of methods for describing the moving body in space. Emphasis is placed on the written and verbal critique of contemporary dance in performance. (HA, GE4a) Davies

East Asian Languages and Literatures (EALL)

East Asian Studies (EAS)

Economics (ECON)

Economics 297 (3) - Economics of Education - topical description - The course is an introduction to the economics of education. We investigate the role of education on outcomes for both nations and individuals. We examine the determinants of education and the multiple factors in the production of education. The course primarily focuses on challenges for pre-K to 12th-grade education faced in the United States with secondary coverage of education in an international context. One common theme that guides our discussion is the impact of existing policies and potential reforms on the achievement and opportunities available to poor and minority students. Additional specific topics to be considered include: school vouchers; class-size; teacher quality; merit pay; school finance; tracking and curriculum; early education programs; the black-white test score gap; the accountability movement and the No Child Left Behind Act. Through discussion, written and oral assignments, the course promotes further development of your ability to apply economic analysis to public policy debates. Diette

Education (EDUC)

Engineering (ENGN)

English (ENGL)

English 101A (3) - Expository Writing: International Issues - topical description - This section is designed for non-native speakers of English and provides extensive group and individualized help with reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. We study some international issues and compare life in other countries with contemporary life in the United States. The course involves students teaching us about their native countries. (FW, GE1) Smout

English 101B (3) - Expository Writing: Human Values and Beliefs - topical description - Beginning with Man's Search for Meaning, a classic description of the mental experiences of concentration camp inmates, students in this section read two books and several essays about the role of values and beliefs in human life, focusing especially on the life of college students. This section is intended for students who are native speakers of English. (FW, GE1) Smout

English 105A (3) - Journeys: Ancient and Modern - topical description - Students read and study two archetypal journeys in ancient literature along with modern counterparts (Homer's The Odyssey and Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain; Dante's Inferno and T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land). Paper assignments include thematic and argumentative investigations of such topics as the imaginative value of "home" and of "hell." (FW, GE1) Dransfield

English 105B (3) - Composition and Literature: Coming of Age - topical description - This course examines a number of literary works that deal with the process of coming of age - the fundamental human movement from youth to adulthood, naïveté to awareness, innocence to experience. In discussions and essays, we focus on the tensions, pains, joys, myths, and realities of this transition. Major questions include: what are the crucial stages involved in coming of age? How do issues such as authority, rebellion, and conformity affect one's coming of age? How does the process differ for men and women? What roles do sexuality and desire play in this process? What larger patterns - mythic, religious, social, economic - are reflected in this movement? How is coming of age related to love? to death? What happens if the "normal" pattern is broken? Readings will include Sophocles' Oedipus the King, Shakespeare's Hamlet, Jamie O'Neill's At Swim, Two Boys, the poetry of William Wordsworth, and Toni Morrison's Paradise. (FW, GE1) Conner

English 105C (3) - Composition and Literature: Country and City - topical description - In this course we read literary works that explore ideas about place. What makes a place significant? How does place function in creating personal and communal identities? How do representations of place change according to historical and linguistic contexts? We read works in a variety of genres, periods, and national traditions. Some representative writers could include Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Whitman, Dickinson, Bishop, Linda Hogan, Tom Stoppard, Aldo Leopold, Barry Lopez, Rick Bass, and Pattiann Rogers. (FW, GE1) Warren

English 105D (3) - Composition and Literature: Nonconformity and Community - topical description - What is the proper role of nonconformity in the healthy community? How much conformity is needed to sustain a culture? Are complete nonconformity and strict conformity even possible? Students read and discuss classic and contemporary texts (by Melville, Emerson, Churchill, Solomon, and others) as we ask questions about the importance of sameness and difference within the various communities to which we belong. (FW, GE1) Pickett

English 105E (3) - Composition and Literature: American Gods - topical description - Students in this class consider what creeds and values have jostled together in the literatures of the United States and, more generally, what Americans hold sacred. Our readings include 19th-, 20th, and 21st-century poetry and fiction, from Melville and Dickinson to Ginsberg, Kingston, and Silko. (FW, GE1) Wheeler

English 105F (3) - Composition and Literature: Mysteries, Puzzles, and Conundrums - topical description - We concern ourselves with mysteries, not in the generic sense of stories about crime and detection, but mysteries of character, morality, religion, and art. Central to each of the works we read is some puzzle, secret, riddle, enigma, ambiguity, or complexity. (Sometimes the work itself is the mystery, a kind of hieroglyph.) Each work, in its own way, raises questions about the methods and the limitations of human discovery. (FW, GE1) Oliver

English 105G (3) - Composition and Literature: Sherlock & Co. - topical description - Beginning with the dramatic monologues of Robert Browning, H. R. F. Keating's verse novel Jack and the Lady Killer, and Susan Glaspell's play Trifles, students focus on the narrative forms and interpretive challenges of detective fiction. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories are accompanied by modern revisions of the legendary detective, in Michael Chabon's The Final Solution and Laurie R. King's The Beekeeper's Apprentice. The course readings coordinate with a visit of Michael Chabon to campus. (FW, GE1) Keen

English 105H (3) - Composition and Literature: Gossips and Con Artists - topical description - This course explores textual representations of two prominent social discourses: gossiping and conning. Through critical reading, collaborative learning, and argumentative writing, we explore diverse characterizations of the gossip and the con artist in a variety of genres and texts, ranging from Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing to F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. We analyze the various schemes and rhetorical strategies that gossips and cons employ in the texts to exert social influence, their understanding and manipulation of the status quo, their motivations and rewards, and their effects upon both the individual and the larger community. To further our practice of sound argumentative writing, we juxtapose the discourses of gossip and con artistry with our own modes for persuading readers. In addition, we think critically about our personal susceptibility to the influences of the gossip and the con as well as our inclinations to (sometimes?) play their roles. (FW, GE1) Wall

English 105I (3) - Composition and Literature: I See Dead People - topical description - This course focuses on literary representations of spirits and the afterlife. Texts may include: Henry James, The Turn of the Screw; A. S. Byatt, The Conjugal Angel; W. P. Kinsella, Shoeless Joe; Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit; Thornton Wilder, Our Town; Toni Morrison, Beloved. (FW, GE1) Gavaler

English 105J (3) - Composition and Literature: Literary Animals - topical description - In this course, we read and write about literary representations of animals: poetry, plays, stories, and novels that take animals as characters, contemplate the relation between humans and other animals, and/or attempt to consider animals on their own terms. From classic to contemporary literature, our texts invite us to think about animals as companions, as possessions, as food, as competitors, as deities, as reminders of the limits of human knowledge or experience, as metaphors for ourselves. These questions give us occasion to focus on the central work of this course: building students' college-level writing skills, particularly the ability to develop complex analyses and communicate them in clear, sophisticated prose. (FW, GE1) Braunschneider

English 105K (3) - Composition and Literature: Wicked Women - topical description - This section begins with Chaucer's Wife of Bath and ends with recent essays on Hillary Clinton. We look at witchcraft, femme fatales, and prostitutes as a way of considering literary approaches towards women and men's power and sexuality. The course is not for women only - for instance, our discussion of witchcraft and wizardry will run from Miller's The Crucible through excerpts from Harry Potter. (FW, GE1) Brodie

English 292 (3) - Modern British Poetry - topical description - This course concentrates on poetry from 1870 through 1950, asking how British poets have pushed the limits of traditional verse. British poets are known for being less innovative than their American and Continental peers. We sample poems by Walt Whitman and William Carlos Williams before asking: what did "experimentation" mean to Gerard Manley Hopkins and Thomas Hardy? And how did Yeats experiment with history in his poems, as opposed to Ezra Pound? We also see how female poets, such as Edith Sitwell and Stevie Smith, developed highly original voices, and we end by sampling the works of more recent poets, including an influx of immigrant writers. (HL, GE3) Brodie

English 293 (3) - Wilderness in American Literature - topical description - "There are some who can live without wild things, and some who cannot." This course investigates ideas of wilderness in selected writings by American writers from a variety of periods and perspectives. We read fiction, nonfiction, and poetry by writers like Henry David Thoreau, John Burroughs, John Muir, Mary Austin, Aldo Leopold, Cormac McCarthy, and Terry Tempest Williams. Writing assignments include examinations and analytical papers. (HL, GE3) Warren

English 299A (3) - Seminar for Prospective Majors: H. G. Wells - topical description - This course offers an intensive study of the life, works, and cultural status of one of the modern world's most influential writers. Best known as one of the pioneers of science fiction, Wells was also one of the leading realistic novelists of the early 20th century, and later an innovative and popular historian and autobiographer. This course samples all of these aspects of his career - and allows the students a wide variety of research topics: on Wells' science fiction classics and their various film adaptations, on his realistic novels of everyday life, on his great Outline of History, and on his fascinating meditations upon his life as a writer and the complex relations between his fictions and his experiences. (HL, GE3) Adams

English 299B (3) - Seminar for Prospective Majors: Seduction and Literature - topical description - Stories of seduction captivate us with their themes of virtue and villainy. These tales of love and abuse ask us to think about agency, complicity, responsibility, and resistance because they highlight the workings of power dynamics within erotic relationships. The roles of seducer and seduced are often unstable, forcing us to think about how we distinguish between coercion and consent. Scenes of seduction also offer provocative representations of female and male desire, which provides us with an opportunity to consider desire at the level of fantasy and to interrogate the gender politics behind portrayals of desire. In this course, we consider both non-fiction and fiction, including works by Plato, Roland Barthes, Vladimir Nabokov, and Marguerite Duras, as we investigate the psychic, political, and sexual stakes of seduction. As readers, we also reflect on our own responses to the verbal persuasiveness of the narrative's seductive designs. (HL, GE3) Hall

English 320 (3) - Shakespearean Tragedy - topical description - This course studies many of Shakespeare's tragedies in their order of composition, from his first, gory attempt at the form, the Roman Titus Andronicus, to his last two Roman tragedies Antony and Cleopatra and Coriolanus. The context of these Roman bookends will help frame our study of the "big four" (Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth). In addition, we will read classical and contemporary criticism on tragedy from Aristotle's Poetics to the present and the (arguably) biggest extant influence on Hamlet: Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy. Finally, the class attends the American Shakespeare Center's productions of Romeo and Juliet and Anthony and Cleopatra at the Blackfriars Theater in Staunton. (HL, GE3) Pickett

English 413A (3) - Senior Research and Writing: Personal Writing and Testimonial - topical description - This course has two major parts, one historical and one creative. We begin the first six weeks with readings related to the rise of the autobiographical voice in English literature. We study early autobiographical texts (ranging from the 15th to the 18th century), such as heresy trial accounts, spiritual autobiographies, diary entries, and travel narratives. As we read through these texts, we consider what experiences, as well as potential audiences, authorize writers to speak about themselves. Is it religious conversion, mistreatment by peers or authorities, prophetic revelation, observation of another culture, the desire to vindicate oneself before accusers, the need to account for one's belief, or a privileged viewing of the bizarre or marvelous? At the same time, we will be working on our own autobiographical material, doing free-writing based upon a series of exercises (i.e., recalling a first memory; recounting an experience of unjust treatment; recollecting events or feelings related to family photographs, etc.). In the second half of the term, students will each select an autobiography or memoir that they want the rest of us to read and critique. Final student work will result in either 1) a research paper on a chosen autobiographical text, either early or modern, or 2) a creative, autobiographical piece. (HL, GE3) Gertz

English 413B (3) - Senior Research and Writing: Poetry and Community - topical description - How do people use poetry? How does poetry itself resist being useful? In this section we study poetry as entertainment, education, and a vehicle for social change in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries, with particular attention to its oral performance in various contexts. Students will also be required to volunteer two hours per week in a poetry-related service placement arranged by Aubrey Shinofield, Service Learning Coordinator. Student research projects, commenced after the break, may spring from our joint readings or the service placements. Alternately, they may concern other, related phenomena: poetry slams, independent presses and magazines as communities, poetry as therapy, poetry's role in personal and public ritual, internet-based poetry communities, poetry's role in social movements, and contemporary educational projects such as Poets in the Schools and the National Poetry Recitation Project. (HL, GE3) Wheeler 

Environmental Studies (ENV)

French (FREN)

French 281 (3) - Culture et civilisation françaises - Traditions et changements - topical description - Prerequisite: French 261 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. This course seeks to familiarize students with significant aspects of French culture and civilization. It examines the interaction of social, political, economic and artistic developments throughout the centuries. Though it follows a chronological order, it does not attempt to be an exhaustive historical survey. Rather, through the presentation of a wide array of documents, it encourages students to understand the issues that shaped national identity and the philosophies that brought about today's institutions. (HU) Frégnac-Clave

French 331 (3) - Le voyage dans la littérature française - topical description - Prerequisite: French 273 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on the theme of the journey. Through a study of such writers as Chrétien de Troyes, Voltaire, Jules Verne, and others, students acquire a general knowledge of French literature's evolution. (HL, GE3) Kamara

French 341 (3) – Sur les traces de Cléopâtre captive et Maître Pathelin: comédies et tragédies de Corneille Racine et Molière - topical description - Prerequisite: French 331 or French 332 or permission of instructor. This course offers an overview of the French theater's evolution from its inception in the Middle Ages until the end of the 17th century, of which six plays constitute the major focus of study. Illustrating the classical dichotomy of comedy and tragedy, as well as that of religious and secular tragedy, works analyzed in class and in three essays are the highly comical, relatively short medieval Farce de maître Pathelin, a few excerpts from two 16th-century tragedies, two comedies by Molière, two tragedies by Corneille and two tragedies by Racine. (HL, GE3) Fralin

French 397 (3) - Séminaire avancé. La France sous l’Occupation - topical description - Prerequisite: Three courses at the 300 level or by permission of the instructor. Non-majors who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to apply for permission to take this course. The particular topic chosen for this course is life in France during the German Occupation (1940-1944), and how the controversy that raged then has endured in French society. Materials for the course include a whole array of multimedia: literary texts, historical documents, songs, documentary and fiction films, etc. Oral reports and discussions are conducted in French and all papers are to be written in French. (HL) Frégnac-Clave

Freshman Seminars (various disciplines, title has FS:)

Art 180 (3) – FS:Visual Culture An introduction to contemporary image culture and the constant flow of images in daily life.  The course examines cross-disciplinary approaches to making and reading images, including visual art, popular and underground visual culture, media culture, medical and scientific imaging, and consumer culture.  In addition to exploring how visual culture works, the course introduces the critical theories that underlie its interpretation. (HA) Ryan

Geology 100 (4) - FS: General Geology: Field Emphasis - Washington and Lee is surrounded by some of the most interesting and classical geology of the entire Appalachian Mountain system. The campus lies right in the middle of the Great Valley of Virginia, within easy reach of the Blue Ridge Province and the Allegheny Mountains. This courses takes advantage of our superb location, traveling to a new field site for each class meeting (including Goshen Pass, North Mountain, Devil's Marbleyard, Panther Falls, Island Ford Cave, and the Blue Ridge Mountains). We conduct a “hands-on” study of the basic principles of geology while unraveling the geologic history of the area. During the term, the class convenes for blocks of time to promote class discussions and to undertake laboratory and field-based investigations using maps, rocks and minerals, laboratory and computational techniques, and scientific writing. This course is appropriate for those students curious about their natural world who enjoy spending time outdoors. Laboratory course credit. (SL) (Greer)

Philosophy 180 (3) - FS: Science and Nature, Self and Culture - topical description - Evolutionary theory, genetics, psychology, and neuroscience - all have transformed and continue to transform how we understand what it means to be human and lead a good, ethical life. Is there such a thing as human nature? How much of who we are depends on our genes, how much on environment? Would it be unethical to genetically design your child to be better-looking, smarter, and more athletically skilled than she otherwise would be? Does the government have an interest in regulating which genetic profiles are proliferated in future generations? Is there such a thing as cultural evolution? Is your mind/self just an illusory interface for your brain? What are we to do with the rapidly increasing knowledge of (and resultant technologies involving) the human animal? This seminar will examine such questions as we think about human nature, morality, and the place of science and technology in culture. (HU) Gregory

Poverty Studies 101A (3) - FS: Poverty: An Interdisciplinary Introduction - The freshmen seminar parallels Poverty and Human Capability 101.  The seminar will cover the same material and require the same assignments.  101A will differ from 101 in that the seminar format will be limited to fifteen freshmen.  Optional revision of papers and other optional assignments will be available in both courses with the expectation that students in 101A will frequently take advantage of these options.  Freshmen who prefer a class with more experienced students should take 101, and they will receive the same attention from the instructor in a slightly larger class setting.  Freshmen who prefer the somewhat more intense seminar setting with grade-level peers only should enroll in 101A.  Students in both courses will be expected to perform orally as well as in writing. (HU) Beckley

Religion 181 (3) - FS:Perspectives on Death and Dying - topical description - A comparison of ways in which various religious traditions, as well as modern secular writers, describe and conceive of death and the meaning of life in the face of our human mortality. Students study scripture, poetry, memoirs, novels, essays, and film, and write journals and formal essays. Includes several guest speakers and visits to funeral home and cemetery. (HU) Marks

Spanish 211 (3) – FS: Spanish Civilization and Culture - Prerequisite: (Permission of the department based on AP/IB or W&L placement test). This freshmen seminar, limited to fifteen students, parallels SPAN 211 - Spanish Civilization and Culture and will be taught in Spanish.  From prehistoric times to present day, this course explores the most notable developments and trends that have been decisive in forging Spain’s cultural heritage and identity.  Phoenician, Iberian, Roman, Jewish, Moorish, and Christian cultures, among others, have all contributed significantly in forming the melting pot of Spanish culture.  We will examine the most important artistic, political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual contributions of each culture to Spain’s heritage. (HU) Ruiz

Geology (GEOL)

Geology 197 (3) - Tectonics - topical description - Broadly defined, tectonics is the branch of geology dedicated to the study of the large-scale structure of the earth’s crust. This general education course provides an introduction to mountains and mountain building processes. The course traces the evolution of ideas about mountains, from the early fixist concepts of the 18th century to modern perspectives that emphasize horizontal motions. Special emphasis is placed on the plate tectonic revolution of the 1960’s and how it revolutionized geologists’ understanding of mountain belts. The geology and large-scale structure of mountains will be described in the context on their plate tectonic setting. Modern concepts in tectonics will be illustrated with many natural examples, including the Appalachians, the European Alps, the Himalaya, the Andes and the Basin and Range Province of the southwestern United States. (SC, GE5c) Rahl

German (GERM)

Greek (GR)

History (HIST)

History 104 (3) - Japan: Origins to Atomic Aftermath - revised description - The first half of the course covers the emergence of indigenous Japanese society and its adaptation to cultural and political influences from mainland East Asia, including Buddhism, Confucianism, and Chinese concepts of empire. The second half covers Japan's successful transition from a declining Tokugawa Shogunate to a modern imperial nation to a reluctant US Cold War ally from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries. (HU, GE4b) Bello

History 195 (3) - Islamic Civilization to 1500 - topical description - A survey of the history of Islamic Civilization from its origins in the Arabian Peninsula to its status as a world community spanning from Spain to Indonesia by the medieval period, focusing on the development of distinctive Islamic political institutions, social dynamics, and intellectual and artistic productions. Particular attention paid to the tension between the idealized concept of a unified civilization and the observed geographical and cultural diversity of Muslim communities in history. (HU, GE4b) Hatcher

History 308 (3) - Europe, 1815-1871 - Cancelled

History 337 (3) - Revolutions in Latin America - newly offered course - Detailed analysis of 20th-century revolutionary movements in Latin America. Examines historical power struggles, social reforms, and major political changes, with in-depth exploration of Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, Peru, Chile, and Nicaragua. Explores the social movements and ideologies of under-represented historical actors, such as peasants, guerrillas, artists, workers, women, students, and indigenous people. (HU, GE4b) Carey

History 389 (3) - Struggle over China's Environment - topical description - This course covers the more recent periods of China's so-called "3,000 years of unsustainable growth" from about AD 618 into the present. Themes focus on China's historical experience with sedentary agriculture, fossil fuel and nuclear energy, wildlife and forest management, disease, water control, and major construction projects like the Great Wall. (HU, GE4b) Bello

History 337 (3) - Revolutions in Latin America - newly offered course - Detailed analysis of 20th-century revolutionary movements in Latin America. Examines historical power struggles, social reforms, and major political changes, with in-depth exploration of Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, Peru, Chile, and Nicaragua. Explores the social movements and ideologies of under-represented historical actors, such as peasants, guerrillas, artists, workers, women, students, and indigenous people. (HU, GE4b) Carey.

Interdepartmental (INTR)

Italian (ITAL)

Japanese (JAPN)

Journalism (JOUR)

Journalism 295 (3) - The Future of News - topical description - Sophomore standing. Enrollment by non-majors is encouraged. Across the nation, fewer adults are reading newspapers or watching television news regularly. Meanwhile, the growth of the Internet and other digital communication devices continues unabated. What are the roles of new and old media in the future of news? How do young adults get their news, and what impact will their preferences have on the media? Can traditional news media use new technologies to re-engage audiences in civic life? Will journalism continue to play its key role in a democratic society? Reynolds Distinguished Visiting Professor Wendy Zomparelli, recently retired publisher of The Roanoke Times, leads students' attempts to address those questions. News reading and viewing patterns among young adults are examined extensively. Zomparelli

Latin (LATN)

Latin 395 (3) - Augustine's Confessions - topical description - Prerequisites: Latin 201 and 202. In this course, we read the Confessions, the spiritual autobiography of St. Augustine of Hippo. This most introspective of works was not only innovative in its own time but was hugely influential in the history of western literature and ideas. We study the language of Christian Latin in one of its finest forms as we soak up the rhythms of Augustine's beautiful prose. (HL, GE3) Johnson

Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 101 (3) -- Introduction to Latin American & Caribbean Studies - newly offered course - A multi-disciplinary, introductory course designed to familiarize students with the pertinent issues that determine or affect the concept of identity in Latin American and Caribbean societies through a study of their geography, history, politics, economics, literature, and culture. The purpose of the course is to provide a framework or overview to enhance understanding in the students' future courses in particular disciplines and specific areas of Latin American and Caribbean study. (HU) Barnett. Fall
 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 421 (1), 422 (2), and 423 (3) - Interdisciplinary Research - newly offered course - Prerequisites: LACS 101, junior or senior standing, and permission of the instructor. Independent research into a topic centered within Latin America or the Caribbean, directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students are expected to share their work with the public through a public presentation. Barnett. 

Literature in Translation (LIT)

Mathematics (MATH)

Medieval and Renaissance Studies (MRST)

Military Science (MS)

Music (MUS)

Neuroscience (NEUR)

Philosophy (PHIL)

Philosophy 180 (3) - FS: Science and Nature, Self and Culture - topical description - Evolutionary theory, genetics, psychology, and neuroscience - all have transformed and continue to transform how we understand what it means to be human and lead a good, ethical life. Is there such a thing as human nature? How much of who we are depends on our genes, how much on environment? Would it be unethical to genetically design your child to be better-looking, smarter, and more athletically skilled than she otherwise would be? Does the government have an interest in regulating which genetic profiles are proliferated in future generations? Is there such a thing as cultural evolution? Is your mind/self just an illusory interface for your brain? What are we to do with the rapidly increasing knowledge of (and resultant technologies involving) the human animal? This seminar will examine such questions as we think about human nature, morality, and the place of science and technology in culture. (HU) Gregory

Philosophy 216 (3) - Feminist Social and Political Philosophy - newly offered course - This course critically examines the gender norms that pervade our identities, govern our everyday behavior, and organize our social life. Questions addressed may include: What is gender? In what ways does it affect the quality of women's and men's lives? Is gender difference natural? Is it valuable? Can it contribute to, or interfere with, human flourishing? Can a gendered society be just? What can any of us do to promote good relations among women and men? (HU, GE4c) Bell


Philosophy 395 (3) - Advanced Seminar: John Rawls and Justice - topical description - John Rawls (1921-2002) is perhaps the foremost moral philosopher of the 20th century. His very influential A Theory of Justice elaborated and defended a rich conception of justice that he called "justice as fairness," critiqued Utilitarian philosophy, and thereby opened up analytic moral philosophy to a wide range of substantive normative concerns. This course concentrates on Rawls' seminal work but also explores some later writings, including Political Liberalism and The Law of People, as Rawls continued to defend his two principles of justice with new lines of argument and also to extend his theory to encompass not only domestic but also international justice. (HU, GE4c) Sessions

Physical Education (PE)

Physical Education - IMPORTANT -- Read the instructions for PE registration at
registrar.wlu.edu/registration/regpe.htm


and the departmental information at
athletics.wlu.edu/physical_education/

Students may express a preference for up to three skills courses as part of web registration. These preferences will be examined after the academic schedule is set and, if open and not in conflict with the academic courses, one may be placed in the schedule. Changes or additional sections may still be handled during the drop/add period.

The following Physical Education ‑ courses have an additional charge, billed to the student's account after registration: PE 151 Golf; PE 170 Horsemanship; PE 178 Ballet; PE 179 Modern Dance; PE 304 First Aid/CPR.

Physical Education 152 (0) – Football – cancelled
Physical Education 160 (0) – Volleyball – cancelled
Physical Education 174 (0) – Backpacking – cancelled
Physical Education 195A (0) – Outdoor Activities: Rock Climbing – topical description
Physical Education 195B (0) – Outdoor Activities: Kayaking - topical description
 

Physics (PHYS)

Physics 345 (3) - Statistical Physics - newly offered course - Prerequisite: Physics 340. A study of the statistical methods used in various branches of physics. The Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distribution functions will be derived and applied to problems in thermodynamics and the physics of solids. Mazilu.

Politics (POL)

Politics 295A (3) - Dispute Resolution - topic description - No prerequisites. May be used toward the global politics requirements in the politics major. Open to majors / non-majors of all classes. Recommended for students interested in civil-society NGOs, consulting / conciliation services, diplomacy, estate management, law. Necessary practical conditions for optimal (efficient, envy-free, fair, stable) dispute-resolution in politics – given: 2-4 disputing sides, uniformly certain or probable information, neutral assessment of risk, equal initial endowments and entitlements, 0 or 1 arbitrator, 1 issue, consensus on the dispute-resolution rules or norms, no collusion, and 1 time-period for resolution. Based on introductory literature in negotiation analysis and fair-division theory, national and international case-studies, occasional problem-sets and (if time permits) Java applets. Details: mccaughrinc@wlu.edu. (SS2) McCaughrin

Portuguese (PORT)

Poverty and Human Capability (POV)

Students interested in Poverty and Human Capability Studies should plan to take Interdepartmental 101 (3), Introduction to Poverty and Human Capability, in the spring. This course meets the requirement for credits (but not for one of the two areas) under GE 4. A list of courses from other departments that qualify for the Poverty and Human Capability Studies transcript recognition appear on the program Web site: http://shepherd.wlu.edu/ .

Psychology (PSYC)

Psychology 395 (3) - Psychology of Women - topical description - Prerequisite: Three credits in psychology or sociology; or Women's Studies 120. This course introduces the student to the psychological literature on women and gender. Course topics include portrayals of women in the media, the development of gender roles, women's close relationships, motherhood, the influence of gender roles on women's psychological and physical health, women and work, and applied gender related issues such as sexual harassment. Woodzicka

Public Speaking (PSPK)

Religion (REL)

Religion 105 (3) Introduction to Islam - newly offered (revised) course - This course is intended to familiarize students with the foundations of the Islamic tradition and the diverse historical and geographical manifestations of belief and practice built upon those foundations. Throughout the course the role of Islam in shaping cultural, social, gender, and political identities is explored. Readings are drawn from the writings of both historical and contemporary Muslim thinkers. (HU, GE4) Staff.

Religion 181 (3) - FS:Perspectives on Death and Dying - topical description - A comparison of ways in which various religious traditions, as well as modern secular writers, describe and conceive of death and the meaning of life in the face of our human mortality. Students study scripture, poetry, memoirs, novels, essays, and film, and write journals and formal essays. Includes several guest speakers and visits to funeral home and cemetery. (HU) Marks

Religion 195 (3) Introduction to Judaism - topical description - Through a variety of sources, including Talmudic debate, novels, liturgy, memoirs, film, and history, this course introduces the main concepts, literature, and practices of the classical form of Judaism that began in the first centuries C.E. in Palestine and Persia, and then examines how Judaism has changed during the last two centuries, in modernist movements (Reform, Neo-Orthodoxy, Zionism) and contemporary fundamentalist movements (Ultra-Orthodoxy, messianic settler Zionism), as well as current ideas and issues. (HU, GE4) Marks

Russian (RUSS)

Russian Area Studies (RAS)

Sociology (SOC)

Sociology 290 (3) - Special Topics: Secularization and Modern Society: The Demise of Religion? - topical description - For some years, "secularization theory" - the view that political and economic "modernization" inevitably produce religion's demise - was nearly the consensus view among social scientists. More recently, scholars have been forced to question this once common belief. Religion seems to remain a powerful force in today's world. So what is its relationship with modernity? Can societies go through modernization processes and retain their religious character? Is today's world witnessing a "religious return" or are most cases of large-scale social action in fact oriented towards secular ends? This class attempts to answer these and related questions. Students have the opportunity to do field research in local religious settings, though they will not be required to do so. Eastwood

Spanish (SPAN)

Spanish 211 (3) – Freshman Seminar: Spanish Civilization and Culture - Prerequisite: (Permission of the department based on AP/IB or W&L placement test). This freshmen seminar, limited to fifteen students, parallels SPAN 211 - Spanish Civilization and Culture and will be taught in Spanish.  From prehistoric times to present day, this course explores the most notable developments and trends that have been decisive in forging Spain’s cultural heritage and identity.  Phoenician, Iberian, Roman, Jewish, Moorish, and Christian cultures, among others, have all contributed significantly in forming the melting pot of Spanish culture.  We will examine the most important artistic, political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual contributions of each culture to Spain’s heritage. (HU) Ruiz

Spanish 350 (3) - The Cuban Story - newly offered course - Prerequisites: Spanish 207 and 215. A multi-genre examination of 20th-century Cuba as its own "story". Beginning with the first European account of Columbus, to insights from slaves, to finally more recent writers who question its future, the course presents the development of Cuban society as its own narrative. Major readings by Manzano, Barnet, Marti, Carpentier, Castro, Guevara, Garcia, and Hernandez Diaz among others. Shorter anthologized works by Guillen, Lezama Lima, Valdes, Novas Calvo, Cabrera Infante, and Sarduy among others. Films by Guitierrz Alea, Vega, Solas, and Tabio, among others. (HL, GE3) Barnett

Theater (THTR)

University Scholars (UNIV)

Women's Studies (WST)

Women's Studies: Students interested in Women's Studies should plan to take Interdepartmental 120 (3), Introduction to Women's Studies and Feminist Theory, in the spring. This course now meets the requirement for credits (but not for one of the two areas) under GE 4. A list of spring-term courses from other departments that qualify for Women's Studies credits appear on the program Web site: http://womensstudies.wlu.edu/ .