Official Notification of Changes
to the 2006-2007 Catalogue


(Updated March 7, 2007)
New courses
Revised courses
Deleted courses
Revised degree, major, and program requirements
Policy Changes
Miscellaneous Information

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COURSE INFORMATION:

Course Additions

African-American Studies 403 (3) - Directed Individual Study. Prerequisites: African-American Studies 130, and either History 359 or 360. Individual reading, research, and writing in an area not covered in other courses. This course may be used for the capstone requirement in African -American Studies, and may be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different. Staff. Fall, Winter, Spring

Anthropology 275 (3) Feminist Anthropology. This course covers the complex and sometimes "awkward" relationship between feminism and anthropology. We explore topics such as the place of feminist theory and politics within the discipline of anthropology, the problems involved in being a feminist and an anthropologist, and the creation of feminist ethnography. Goluboff. Fall 2008 and alternate years.

Anthropology285 (Religion 285) (3) - Introduction to American Indian Religions. This class introduces students to some of the dominant themes, values, beliefs, and practices found among the religions of North America's Indian peoples. The first part of the course explores the importance of sacred power, landscape, and community in traditional Indian spiritualities and rituals. It then examines some of the changes that have occurred in these traditions as a result of western expansion and dominance from the 18th through early-20th centuries. Lastly, the course considers some of the issues and problems confronting contemporary American Indian religions. (GE4 in religion). Markowitz. Winter

Art 180 (3) -  Freshman Seminar: The Silk Road: Connecting East and West - topical description - As American as apple pie or fireworks on the Fourth of July? Think again. Much that we hold to be typically Western, in fact has its origins in Asia. Fireworks originated in China, and apples are believed to have come from the Caucasus. At the heart of this course is the Silk Road, a European term for the network of trade routes that brought silk, among other commodities such gunpowder, paper, porcelain and pasta, from Asia to the West, beginning more than 2,000 years ago. The Silk Road was always about a lot more than silk, however. This seminar will explore the various ways that the Silk Road, by camel caravan across central Asia and, later, by sailing ship using new maritime routes, facilitated exchanges of commodities and technologies, arts and ideas between China and the rest of the world for over two thousand years. We have been used to thinking of Asia in terms of its Westernization in the course of the last century. Examining new material, and some familiar material from new points of view, introduces a shift—from the Eurocentric perspective that underlies the worldview of most Americans—to a more global perspective on the world. Whatever your point of departure—whether an interest in economics and commerce, music or art, the worlds of ancient Rome or pre-modern Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia, or Buddhism and India, or China and, ultimately, Japan—this is a course that should pique your interest and broaden your horizons.(GE4a) O'Mara.

Art 260 (3) - Photography III. Prerequisite: Art 161 or permission of instructor. A continuation of principles learned in Art 160 and 161, with a particular focus on large-format photography and the craft of fine printing. (GE4 as art or FDR HA) Bowden. Fall

Art 265 (3) - Digital Darkroom. Prerequisite: Art 160 or permission of instructor. A continuation of principles learned in Photography I, applied to the digital realm. Topics covered include advanced exposure in film and digital formats, scanning, imaging, and digital printmaking. (GE4 as art or FDR HA) Bowden. Winter 2007 and alternate years

Art 270 (3)­ - Introduction to the Artist's Book. A creative exploration of the tradition of the handmade artist's book. Students learn to make several styles of binding, including accordion books, pop‑ups, pamphlets, and Japanese bindings. They develop some skill in letterpress printing and work with sequential design, creative writing, and simple printmaking and photo transfer techniques to create original handmade books. Some readings, discussions, and slide lectures introduce students to the ingenious and varied history of the artist's book. Besides constructing imaginative individual book art projects, students create one collaborative project. (HU, GE4a) Ryan. Spring 2007 and alternate years

Art 360 (3) - Photography IV. Prerequisite: Art 260 or permission of instructor. Advanced studies in the fine art of photography and the photographic print. Topics may include traditional, digital, or alternative process techniques in either black-and-white or color. Work in larger film and print formats is encouraged. (GE4 as art or FDR HA) Bowden. Fall

Biology 120 (Chemistry 120) (4) - Atmospheric Science from the Ground Up. One of the most complex and important physical systems that scientists must understand is the climate. Predictions regarding climate change and the impact of human activity on that change are made based on our understanding of the complex interactions that drive atmospheric composition and the interaction of the atmosphere with the biosphere and the geosphere. Society asks critical questions - both global and local in reach - regarding the impact of climate change and the drivers behind that change. Answers to these questions may have significant impact on the world economy and choices we make locally, statewide, and nationally. Washington and Lee is located three miles from I‑81, a major trucking route for interstate commerce. The atmospheric pollutants generated by the traffic on I‑81 have an impact on the atmosphere, watersheds (including Chesapeake Bay), plants, and soils. In this course, field and laboratory exercises include the analysis of atmospheric inputs from I‑81 and their impacts on soil and plant concentrations of contaminants. Lectures provide background so that informed hypotheses may be made relating to the influences of highways on local and regional atmospheres and environmental contamination are tested. Laboratory course (GE 5a) Hamilton and Tuchler. Spring 2006 and alternate years.

Biology 230 (4) Field Biogeography and Species Conservation. Prerequisites: Biology 111 and 113 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: English 294. This course emphasizes the patterns of diversity encountered during visits to different regional plant communities where we use professional floristic works to identify vascular plants. In addition, evolutionary and ecological explanations for patterns of distribution and extinction, and the lessons these teach for conservation, are explored. (GE5a or FDR SL) Knox. Spring

Biology 321 (3) - Advanced Genetics Laboratory. Prerequisite: Biology 221 and permission of instructor. A research‑based practicum on the acquisition and analysis of DNA sequence data. Students pursue lab‑based independent projects to gain proficiency in DNA sequencing, and practice analyzing and comparing the DNA sequence data obtained. Laboratory course. Cabe. Spring.

Business Administration 356 (3) - Commercial Bank Lending. Prerequisite: Business Administration 221. This course focuses upon short‑term and long‑term lending decisions made by commercial banks. Topics include credit analysis, loan structuring, seasonal and revolving lines of credit, term loans, leasing, and the evaluation of a borrower=s debt capacity. The course is interactive and makes intensive use of the case method, requiring evaluation of alternatives and decision‑making. The cases are discussed from the viewpoints of both lenders and borrowers. Kester. Spring

Business Administration 390-391 (3-3) - Supervised Study Abroad. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, other prerequisites as specified by the instructor, and approval of the International Education Committee. These courses are linked; the second must be completed to receive any credit for the first. This course covers topics of current interest in business administration for which international travel provides a unique opportunity for enhancing understanding. Emphasis changes from year to year and is announced well in advance of registration. Staff. Spring (when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit)

Chemistry 120 (Biology 120) (4) - Atmospheric Science from the Ground Up. See description above.

Chemistry 133 (3) - Describing Nature. This writing‑based seminar considers how scientists describe natural phenomena and express scientific theories in terms of mathematics, graphical representations, and prose. Students examine a collection of topics from physics, chemistry and biology and examine how accepted explanations of these phenomena in terms of mathematical models are verified by experiment and then translated to concepts using ordinary language. In essence, if a scientific theory is expressed as an equation, how can we understand it in terms of pictures and words? Topics include entropy, the uncertainty principle, and definitions of life. (GE5c) Desjardins. Fall.

Chemistry 175 (3) - Developing Outreach Activities for Local Schools. Prerequisite: Chemistry 100, Chemistry 106, or Chemistry 111. This spring term service‑learning course teaches the development of hands‑on laboratory activities to fulfill physical science goals required by the Science Standards of Learning for Virginia's Public Schools. Students create instructional science experiments for chosen age levels to explore, and implement activities with school children in Lexington City and Rockbridge County School classrooms. Students visit at least two different classrooms. Primarily a laboratory course. LaRiviere. Spring 2007 and alternate years

Chemistry 298 (3) - Special Topics in Chemistry. Prerequisite or corequisite: 16 credits in chemistry or departmental permission. Three‑credit studies of special topics. May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different. Possible topics include RNA biochemistry, medicinal chemistry, and atmospheric chemistry and the environment. Staff. Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.

Chemistry 342 (3) - Biochemistry II. Prerequisite: Chemistry 242, either Chemistry 341 or Biology 215, and permission of the instructor. A continuation of Chemistry 341 with an emphasis on the structure, function, and metabolism of nucleic acids. Topics covered in detail include gene expression and regulation, DNA replication and repair, RNA transcription and processing, and protein synthesis and degradation. LaRiviere. Winter

Chemistry 344 (1) ‑ Biochemistry II Laboratory. Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 342. A laboratory course designed to demonstrate the fundamental techniques used to study nucleic acids. Methods to isolate and characterize DNA and RNA include PCR, gel electrophoresis, hybridization techniques, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. LaRiviere. Winter.

Chinese 100 (6) - Supervised Study Abroad: Beginning Chinese. Prerequisite: Permission of the department and approval of the International Education Committee. This course is designed to introduce Chinese language and culture to students with little or no previous Chinese language background and prepare them for studying first-year Chinese. Combining language study with studies of other aspects of Chinese culture (literature, art, history, economy, etc.) provides students with first‑hand experience of the development of contemporary China. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. Students learn through personal experience about the emergence of modern China and its changing culture. Fu. Spring

Chinese 101 (3) - Exploring Chinese Language and Culture. This course is an introduction to Chinese language and culture. Students learn elementary oral and written Chinese and also about the evolution of the Chinese language. Slides, media presentations and film clips are used to demonstrate the impact the language has had on the culture and their interactions in contemporary Chinese society. This course is not a prerequisite for Chinese 111, nor does it allow a student to move to a language course numbered higher than Chinese 111 without permission of the instructor. Staff. Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

Chinese 115 (6) - Supervised Study Abroad: First‑Year Chinese. Prerequisite: Chinese 112, permission of the department, and approval of the International Education Committee. This course is designed to improve active oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying second‑year Chinese. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students have opportunities to mingle with ordinary Chinese people, to engage in everyday conversation, and to have first‑hand experience of the development of contemporary China. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. Fu. Spring

Chinese 265 (6) - Supervised Study Abroad: Second‑Year Chinese. Prerequisite: Chinese 261 or 262, permission of the department, and approval of the International Education Committee. This course is designed to further improve student oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for or studying third‑year Chinese. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students discuss and debate with Chinese students about emerging social, economic, and policy issues. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. Fu. Spring

Classics 180 (3) -  Freshman Seminar: The Moral World of Antiquity - topical description - Values, virtues, honor, and responsible behavior are hallmarks of a civilized society. Although contemporary philosophers, historians, poets, scientists, and all thoughtful people ponder these of issues, these concepts and ideals originate in ancient times, even perhaps to the very beginnings of civilization. Students examine the range of perspectives on values, virtues and moral discourse in writings among ancient Greeks, Romans, Jews, and early Christians. The seminar is an introduction to the world of antiquity and moral discourse through careful reading of examples from the literatures of these diverse ancient cultures. We include the literature of classical philosophers such as the Platonists, Stoics, Epicureans, and Cynics, Jewish texts including those of the sage in Ecclesiasticus, of Philo (an Alexandrian Platonist Jew), of Palestinian rabbis, and from the Qumran community (the site of the Dead Sea Scrolls), and reflections on early Christianity found in the letters of Paul and one of the Gospels. We study these texts contextually, historically, geographically, and as literature, to determine how each of these varied individuals and traditions formulated and thought about moral discourse. (GE4c) Carras

Classics 238 (3) - Pompeii. The site of ancient Pompeii presents a thriving Roman town of the first century AD virtually frozen in time by the devastating eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. In this course, we examine Pompeii's archaeological remains - public buildings, domestic architecture, painting, artifacts, inscriptions, and graffiti - in order to reconstruct the life of the town. We also consider religion, games and entertainment, politics, and the structure of Roman society. (GE6 as sociology only.) Benefiel. Spring when interest is expressed and departmental resource permit.

Computer Science 250 (3) - Introduction to Robotics. Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or 121 or permission of instructor. This course combines readings from the contemporary robotics literature with hands‑on lab experience building robots with the popular Lego Mindstorms toolkit (provided). The lab experience culminates with a peer‑judged competition of robot projects proposed and built during the second half of the course. (GE5c) Levy. Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.

Computer Science 252 (3) - Neural Networks and Graphical Models. Prerequisite: Computer Science 112. A survey of the major developments in neural and belief networks, from the early perceptron models of the 1940s through the probabilistic Bayesian networks that are a "hot topic" in artificial intelligence today. Topics include the back-propagation algorithm, simple recurrent networks, Hopfield nets, Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map, learning in Bayesian networks, and Dynamic Bayesian Networks, with readings from both popular textbooks and the scholarly literature. A major focus of the course is on writing programs to implement and apply these algorithms. Levy. Fall 2008 and alternate years

Computer Science 253 (3) - Genetic Algorithms. Prerequisite: Computer Science 112. A survey of the major developments in genetic/evolutionary algorithms, from the Simple Genetic Algorithm through modern multi-objective optimization methods. Topics include fitness landscapes, the Schema and Building Block Hypotheses, learning and the Baldwin Effect, and genetic programming, with readings from both popular textbooks and the scholarly literature. A major focus of the course is on writing programs to implement and apply these algorithms. Levy. Fall 2007 and alternate years.

Dance 110 (1) - University Dance. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Participation in a university dance production for a minimum of 24 hours of rehearsal and performance. A journal recording the rehearsal/performance process is required. May be repeated for up to nine degree credits. Staff. Fall, Winter, Spring

Dance 120 (3) - Introduction to Contemporary Modern Dance. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. This course combines the exploration of individual and ensemble artistic expression in contemporary modern dance with the study of the history of modern dance. The course culminates in a performance presentation. (GE4a) Staff. Fall

Dance 220 (3) - Dance Composition. Prerequisite: Dance 120 or permission of the instructor. A studio course exploring the craft and art of creating dance performances in a variety of styles and contexts. Images, text, music, improvisation and the elements of time, space and energy are examined as sources for dance material leading to group choreography. This course focuses on creating a finished performance piece for presentation. (GE4a) Staff. Fall, Winter

Dance 225 (3) - Intermediate Contemporary Modern Dance Prerequisites: Dance 120 or permission of the instructor. An intermediate studio course devoted to refining effort/shape values and pursuing performance quality phrasing and style in "Horton" modern dance technique. Students investigate self‑directed reverse combinations, deconstruct movement phrases into sequential elements, and learn methods for written and oral analysis of dance. Students practice listening to the body by connecting movement phrases with kinesthetic experiences. The class culminates in a performance presentation. (GE4 in theater or FDR HA) Davies. Winter

Dance 230 (3) ‑ Musical-Theater Dance Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. A studio exploration of choreography in musical theater from the 1940s to the present. Composition, theme, and form are discussed in concert with practical work in restaging historically significant musical dance numbers. Of particular interest are the choreographers' styles and the many dance techniques prevalent in musical theater. These issues are experienced through dance practicum as original choreography is taught. The course culminates in a studio recital. (GE4 in theater or FDR HA) Davies. Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.

Dance 292 (2) - Applied Ballet. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. This studio course is devoted to the practice of classical ballet technique and to the exploration of classical and contemporary ballet in performance. The course culminates in a performance presentation. This course may be repeated for degree credit with permission. Staff. Fall, Winter, Spring

Dance 390 (3) - Topics in Dance Composition. Prerequisite: Dance 220 and permission of the instructor. An advanced studio course for experienced dancers exploring various choreographic styles and methods and the intersections between technique, aesthetics and creative collaboration. The course culminates in a performance piece for presentation. This course may be repeated for degree credit with permission. Staff. Fall, Winter, Spring

Education 280 (6) - Poverty and Education. Prerequisites: Education 200 and/or Interdepartmental 101. This course examines the many obstacles that impoverished children and adolescents face during their formal education. The course seeks to better understand the difficulties these students confront and also examines the varied approaches that some exceptional schools have utilized in successfully educating the underprivileged and at‑risk. Our readings and discussions focus on issues including: the history of educational inequality in the United States; the No Child Left Behind Act and its effects on our current educational system; low‑income communities' ethos concerning school and their children's education; teachers' positive and negative impacts on their students' educations; parental involvement; students' outlook concerning school, effort, and their futures; and an examination of exceptional schools and academic programs. Staff. Spring (when interest is expressed and resources permit)

Education 302 (3) - Understanding Exceptional Individuals Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. This survey course addresses education for exceptional individuals by focusing on etiology, inclusion, and incidence. The course presents an overview of the methods used by teachers, administrators, and parents to provide education to exceptional students. The course examines the educational, social and cultural dimensions of life in American society for individuals with disabilities and for individuals who are gifted. Required for teacher licensure in Virginia. Ojure. Winter

Education 303 (3) - Teaching and Learning in the Content Area Prerequisite: Education 200, 210, and junior standing. This is a course specifically for those who wish to teach on the middle-school or secondary school level. The course examines research on instruction in all content areas. Students have the opportunity to read and critique articles on reading instruction across the curriculum as well as comprehension theory. The major leaning theories of educational psychology are covered as they relate to the organization of instructional material. Students design and field test learning activities based on current theories of instruction. Required for teacher licensure. Ojure. Fall

Engineering 101 (3) - How It Works, How It's Made. An introduction to the engineering and science behind devices that students use or are exposed to everyday. Contemporary equipment and technology along with their applications are presented first, gaining familiarity with a subject before studying the underlying scientific aspects. By investigating "how it works," students become aware of fundamental physical principles. Examining "how it's made," students are exposed to the engineering design criteria which govern all manufactured objects. (GE5c) Kuehner. Fall 2006 and alternate years

English 180 (3) -  Freshman Seminar:  Laughing at Love: Shakespeare's Comedies - topical description - Shakespeare’s romantic comedies of love, sex, and marriage capture the folly, despair, and promise of young love and provide a much-needed counterpoint to the bleak depiction of doomed relationships in his great tragedies. No other dramatic comedies ever written provide quite the stimulating combination of so much to laugh about and so much to think about. In the seminar, we study six plays: The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, The Merchant of Venice, and The Tempest. Each week, we do an intensive examination of one play including close reading of the text, comparisons to other plays or sources, and (with the help of The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare) additional reading about romance, politics, family life, and the status of women in the Elizabethan period. Although Shakespeare’s play reward intensive study on the page, we always keep in mind that these plays were intended for the stage. The seminar includes a visit to the Blackfriars Playhouse in Staunton for a performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and doing our own scene studies. Written work includes an active electronic discussion on Blackboard, a single one-page paper to share with the class, one short paper, and one longer final paper. (GE3) Dobin.

English 231 (3) - Drama Prerequisite: Completion of GE1 composition requirement. An introductory study of drama emphasizing form, history, and performance. Organization may be chronological, thematic, or generic and may cover English‑language, western, or world drama. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the interpretation of theatrical texts. (GE3 or FDR HL) Staff. Winter

English 294 (3) - Topics in Environmental Literature Prerequisite: Completion of the GE1 composition requirement. Studies in the literature of natural history, exploration, and science pertaining to the fundamental relationships between nature and human culture. Versions of this course focus on particular periods and national literatures, or they concentrate on a specific theme or problem. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different. (GE3 or FDR HL) Staff. Spring

Freshman Seminars:
Art 121 (3) ‑ FS: Drawing I (GE4a) Beavers
Art 180 (3) ‑ FS: The Silk Road: Connecting East and West (GE4a) O'Mara
Classics 180 (3) ‑ FS: The Moral World of Antiquity (GE4c) Carras
Classics 204 (Literature in Translation 204) (3) ‑ FS: Augustan Rome (GE3) Carlisle
English 180 (3) ‑ FS: Laughing at Love: Shakespeare's Comedies (GE3) Dobin
Geology 100 (4) ‑ FS: General Geology with Field Emphasis (GE5a) Knapp
History 180 (3) ‑ FS: Natural Disasters in the Americas (GE4b) Carey
Journalism 180 (3) ‑ FS: Religion, Culture, and the Global Media. (GE4 as credit but not for areas) Abah
Music 180 (3) ‑ FS: The Voice: Sound and Science (GE4a) Myers
Philosophy 195A (3) ‑ FS: The Concept of Honor for Freshmen (GE4c) Sessions

Geology 100 (4) ‑ FS: General Geology with Field Emphasis - See Freshman Seminars above

Greek 309 (3) - Greek Prose Composition. Prerequisite: Greek 202 or permission of the instructor. This course offers a review of Greek grammar, an introduction to some finer points of syntax, and a comparative review of literary styles in ancient Greek prose. Students hone their language and literary skills by composing passages in ancient Greek, in the various styles of selected ancient authors. The course also serves as an introduction to the artistry of literary prose in ancient Greek. (HL, GE3) Crotty. Spring 2007 and every third year

History 180 (3) -  Freshman Seminar: Natural Disasters in the Americas - topical description - This seminar examines the history of natural disasters in Latin America and the United States. But why study disasters? First, natural disasters literally open up societies, allowing us to peer into areas and worlds that we might not see in day-to-day life. Just as Hurricane Katrina in 2005 brought us into homes and communities that we don’t normally encounter, the Lima earthquake of 1746 takes us into the residences and even the bedrooms of the rich and poor—areas that historical records usually neglect. Second, natural disasters don’t just open up physical places; they also illuminate spiritual and mental worlds, offering a window on how people viewed life and death, and how they understood religion, nature, science, and technology. Lastly, disasters transformed both physical and mental worlds. They shaped urban planning, agriculture, and the economy, and even made regimes totter or retrench. Disaster studies thus generate several questions that we tackle in this course: Are disasters “natural” or human-induced? How have disasters—and reactions to them—changed over time? Are there differences in reactions to disasters in Latin America and the United States? What are the social and political forces that push people to live in dangerous places? How have different generations of writers, filmmakers, and the media presented disasters? As a seminar, this course emphasizes intensive readings and several short papers to foster lively discussion about hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, climate, fire, and volcanoes in the history of the Americas. Additionally, students research the historical contexts, and then share their work with the class, of the most recent and most raw natural disaster in the Americas—Hurricane Katrina. (GE4b) Carey.

History 324 (3) - International Relations, 1919-1970: The End of European Hegemony. Prerequisite: History 102 or permission of the instructor. Topics include the Versailles peace settlement of 1919, the spread of the British Empire to the Middle East and birth of Palestinian nationalism, the impact of the Great Depression and totalitarianism on international relations, the outbreak of the Second World War, the Holocaust and foundation of the State of Israel, the Nuremberg Trials, decolonization in Africa and Asia, the origins of the Cold War, and the foundation of the European Economic Community. What have Europeans learned about conflict resolution from their experience of two world wars and numerous colonial wars? (HU, GE4b) Patch. Winter 2008 and alternate years

History 323 (3) - International Relations, 1815-1918: Europe and the World. Prerequisite: History 102 or permission of the instructor. Topics include the "Metternich system" for maintaining peace, strains in that system caused by the rise of nationalism, European relations with Africa and Asia during the era of Free Trade, the dramatic expansion of Europe's colonial empires in the late-19th century (with special emphasis on the partition of Africa), the development of rival alliance systems within Europe, and the causes of the First World War. Our goal is to understand the causes of international conflict and the most successful strategies for maintaining peace. (HU, GE4b) Patch. Fall 2007 and alternate years

History 333 (3) - US-Latin American Relations. Examines historical interactions between Latin America and the United States during the last two centuries. Explores foreign policy and government affairs as well as the social, cultural, economic, and ecological dimensions of these transnational interactions. Topics range from military intervention, trade, and international policy to Donald Duck, mountaineering, bananas, and illicit drugs. (HU, GE4b) Carey. Winter 2009 and alternate years

History 355 (3) - America in the 60s: History and Memory. Hippies, Flower Power, Panthers, Berkeley, Free Love, Free Speech, Freedom Rides, Dylan, Woodstock, Vietnam, Jimi, Janice, Bobby, and Martin. The events and images of the 1960s remain a powerful and often divisive force in America's recent history and national memory. This course moves beyond stereotypical images of the "Sixties" to examine the decade's politics, culture, and social movements. Topics include: The Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the Great Society and the War on Poverty, Vietnam, the Anti-War movement and the Counterculture, Massive Resistance, the "Silent Majority and the Rise of the Conservative Right. (HU, GE4b) Michelmore. Winter 2009 and alternate years

History 368 (3) - Building a Suburban Nation: Race, Class and Politics in Postwar America. Together, the overdevelopment of the suburbs and the underdevelopment of urban centers have profoundly shaped American culture, politics and society in the post-World War II period. This course examines the origins and consequences of suburbanization after 1945. Topics include the growth of the national state, the origins and consequences of suburbanization, the making of the white middle class, the War on Poverty, welfare and taxpayers "rights" movements, "black power," and how popular culture has engaged with questions about race and class. In the process of understanding the historical roots of contemporary racial and class advantage and disadvantage, this course sheds new light on contemporary public policy dilemmas. (HU, GE4b) Michelmore. Fall 2008 and alternate years

History 385 (3) - The Yin and Yang of Gender in Late Imperial China (10th-19th centuries). Relations between men and women are the basis of any human society, but the exact nature and interpretation of these relations differ from time to time and from place to place. The concepts of Yin (female) and Yang (male) were integral to the theory and practice of Chinese gender relations during the late-imperial period, influencing marriage, medicine, and law. This course examines the historical significance of late-imperial gender relations across these, and other categories, from both traditional and modern perspectives. (HU, GE4b) Bello. Winter2009 and alternate years

History 386 (3) - Managing Mongols, Manchus and Muslims. The unprecedented expansionism of China's last dynasty, the Qing (1644-1911), produced an ethnically and geographically diverse empire whose legacy is the current map and multi-ethnic society of today's People's Republic of China. The Qing empire's establishment, extension, and consolidation was inextricably bound up with the ethnic identity of its Manchu progenitors. The Manchu attempt to unify diversity resulted in a unique imperial project linking East, Inner, and Southeast Asia. This course explores the multi-ethnic nature and limits of this unification, as well as its 20th-century transformations. (HU, GE4b) Bello. Winter 2009 and alternate years

Italian 111S (4) - Elementary Italian I at John Cabot. Required for students without Italian language background. A course in elementary Italian which emphasizes grammar and the skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehension, with special emphasis on conversational practice in context.. Youngblood.

Journalism 180 (3) -  Freshman Seminar: Religion, Culture, and the Global Media - topical description -  The sex-abuse scandals in the Roman Catholic Church, the consecration of a gay bishop in an Episcopal diocese, the Ten Commandments monument in the Alabama Supreme Court building, the protests over the cartoon drawing of the Prophet Mohammed, controversies over stem-cell research and evolution, English-language broadcasts of Al Jazeera, and struggles over the constitutionality of "faith-based initiatives"—these are only the latest ways that religion has emerged into public debate. And that debate is conducted through the media—the primary location of local, national, and global discourse. Values, symbols and ideas—whether religious, social, political, or cultural—are shaped and shared through the words and images of the media. The goal of this course is to understand the role of the global media as guarantors of public discourse, in supporting, questioning, negating, or shaping the place of religion in public discourse. This course provides students with an overview of global mass media (both entertainment and news) as cultural institutions that use and are used by other cultural institutions, such as religion, in their efforts to adjust to the processes of globalization. We investigate the role of the global media in addressing the issues of religious pluralism, multiculturalism, and citizenship. We focus on the impact of old and new technologies of communication—including rock videos, political rhetoric, books, films, and the Internet—on the ability of the institutions of religion to influence and mobilize geographically isolated groups. As we explore the ways in which the global media compete as mythmakers with traditional institutions, we are better able to understand the increasingly global and multidimensional relationships between the institutions of media and religion.(GE4 as credit but not for one of the areas) Abah.

Latin 326 (3) - The Poetry of Ovid. Readings from the masterpieces of Ovid's poetry, including one or more of the following: The Metamorphoses (a grand mythological epic), The Fasti (festivals and the Roman calendar), The Heroides (fictional letters written by mythological heroines), love poetry (Ars Amatoria and Amores), and his poetry from exile (Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto). Topic varies by term but course may be taken only once. (GE3, HL) Benefiel or Carlisle. Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.

Music 180 (3) -  Freshman Seminar: The Human Voice: Science and Sound - topical description -  This seminar is designed to explore the entirety of the human voice. Through readings, demonstrations, experimental methods, guest lectures, and class discussions, we explore the physiologic and acoustical properties of the voice. Our internal study reveals the anatomy, physiology, and physics that serve to operate this natural instrument. Our external study includes analyses of acoustics, resonance, and voice types through the recorded voice of famous classical and contemporary singers, live performances by guest artists in the Wilson Concert Hall, and private spectrograph analysis of each student’s speaking or singing voice. Readings that feature conflicting viewpoints spur class discussions, individual research topics, and issues for group presentations. This exploration of the human voice is designed especially for those interested in public speaking, pre-medical studies, physics, or singing. This course is open to all freshmen; no class member is required to sing.(GE4a) Myers.

Physical Education 125 (0) - Fitness Fundamentals.  A course designed to introduce students to the fundamental principles, knowledge and skills of basic physical fitness and nutrition. (GE7) Staff Fall, Winter, Spring

Physics 115 (3) - Apples and Anti‑Apples: Physics for the Non‑Scientist. A conceptual overview of the fundamental ideas of modern physics. This non‑laboratory course presents the essential concepts and philosophical and ethical aspects of the most important developments in modern physics, such as quantum mechanics, relativity, particle physics and statistical physics. Discusses the impact of these concepts on our continuous efforts to understand the universe. Algebra and geometry are used but no calculus. (GE5c) Mazilu. Spring 2006 and alternate years.

Poverty and Human Capability Studies 295 (Law 221) (2) - Child Abuse and Neglect Seminar. Prerequisites: Poverty and Human Capability Studies 101 and at least junior standing. This seminar examines the response of the legal system to issues of child abuse and neglect.  Attempts by courts and legislators to define abuse and neglect are reviewed and critiqued.  The seminar also explores the legal framework which governs state intervention to protect children from abuse and neglect.  Attention is paid to both state and federal law, including the federal constitutional issues which arise in many child abuse and neglect proceedings.  Issues relating to the professional responsibilities of lawyers involved in abuse and neglect proceedings are examined. Shaughnessy. Winter 2006 and alternate years

Psychology 235 (3) ‑ Effects of Poverty on Families and Children Prerequisite: Psychology 113 or Poverty 101. This course explores the problem of child and family poverty in the U.S., the issues it raises for psychologists and social policy makers, and the implications that poverty and social policy have for children's development. Major areas addressed in this class include prenatal /infant health issues; cognitive, emotional and educational development in early childhood; rural v. urban poverty; the effects of parental behavior, neighborhood and community distress (such as exposure to violence, inadequate schools and community resources) on development; and the outcome of these on adolescent identity and adult achievement. The course focuses on the U.S. but draws on comparative research about the experiences of many subgroups within US and in other countries. Margand. Winter

Psychology 262 (3) ‑ Gender Role Development Prerequisite: Psychology 113. Prerequisite or corequisite: Psychology 250. This course provides the student with an overview of gender‑role development: How do children learn to be boys and girls? What role do biological factors play in different behaviors of boys and girls? Does society push boys and girls in different directions? We discuss children's evolving ideas about gender, and what can be done to change these ideas (or whether they need to be changed at all). Through the examination of these questions and issues, the course introduces students to the major theories of gender‑role development, the research methods used to measure children's gender‑role behaviors and attitudes, and the current research in the field. Fulcher. Fall

Psychology 362 (3 ‑ Directed Research in Developmental Psychology Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Directed research on a variety of topics in developmental psychology. May not be repeated. Fulcher. Fall

Religion 225 (3) - Magic, Science, and Religion How do religious and scientific explanations and methods of inquiry differ? What are the roles of reason and authority in each case? This course draws together materials from antiquity to the present, from the West and from Asia, to illustrate a variety of types of "systems of knowledge." Theoretical readings are balanced with diverse case studies from a diverse contexts: religious doctrines, mystical practices, alchemy, astrology, sorcery, "traditional medicines," and modern religious movements. Students research a system of their choice and analyze its claims and methods in comparison with those of other traditions covered in the course. (GE4 or FDR HU). Lubin. Spring 2007 and alternate years

Religion 235 (3) - Gods in Transit: The Spread of Religions in Asia This course looks at how deities and religious ideas and practices spread from one place to another through conquest, a network of holy men, or a circuit of traders. The aim is to identify (a) the processes that occur when religions travel from one region to another, and (b) the role of these religions in creating new cultures shared across a wide area. The focus is mainly on pre‑modern periods, but comparisons are made with religious pluralism and globalization in the modern world. (GE4 or FDR HU). Lubin. Winter 2007 and alternate years

Religion 281 (3) - Modern Islamic Thought. A study of Islamic religious movements and representative religious writings of the past two centuries, with focus upon "fundamentalist" or "Islamicist" writings and upon recent authors responding to them. (GE4d) Marks. Fall 2007 and alternate years.

Religion/Anthropology 285 (3) - Introduction to American Indian Religions This class introduces students to some of the dominant themes, values, beliefs, and practices found among the religions of North America's Indian peoples. The first part of the course explores the importance of sacred power, landscape, and community in traditional Indian spiritualities and rituals. It then examines some of the changes that have occurred in these traditions as a result of western expansion and dominance from the 18th through early-20th centuries. Lastly, the course considers some of the issues and problems confronting contemporary American Indian religions. (GE4 in history). Markowitz. Winter

Religion 335 (3) - Hindu Law in Theory and Practice This course introduces Hindu law, in both historical and comparative perspectives. We begin with introductory reflections on the nature and role of law in society, the relationship between religion and state in the law in general, and in India in particular. Other topics covered include the origins of Hindu law in priestly ritual codes, political theory, and local custom; Dharma as religious jurisprudence; premodern legal practice; British attempts to codify Hindu law; Hindu personal law in modern India; and the controversy over religion and secularism in the courts today, including the constitutional definition of "Hindu," attempts to legislate against disapproved religious practices, and disputes over sacred spaces. We close with comparisons with legal reasoning about religion in America, Israel, and England, based on court cases. (GE4 or FDR HU). Lubin. Fall 2007 and alternate years

Religion 431 (1) - Senior Thesis Preparation Prerequisite: Senior religion major or permission of the department. In consultation with a faculty adviser, students select a thesis topic, work with a member of the library staff to learn requisite research skills and to develop an annotated bibliography for their thesis, and write a prospectus for the thesis to be completed in the winter term. Library staff and all religion faculty. Fall

Sociology 272 (3) ‑ Social Revolutions. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101, Sociology 102, or permission of the instructor. This seminar provides an in‑depth exploration of a variety of social revolutions. The overarching goal of the course is to discern whether or not a single "theory of revolutions" can be constructed. Are there common patterns to be observed in (and common causes behind) events as separated by time, place, and ideology as the 17th-century "Glorious Revolution" in England, the French Revolution, Latin American revolutions (including the Wars of Independence and the Mexican Revolution), the Russian Revolution, and more recent events such as the revolution that brought the current regime in Iran to power? To this end, students read and discuss a variety of such theories that have been put forward by sociologists, historians, and political scientists and then consider case studies of the aforementioned social revolutions in order to scrutinize these theories. Eastwood. Winter 2007 and alternate years

Sociology 274 (3) ‑ Sociology of Literature. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101, Sociology 102, or permission of the instructor. This seminar introduces students to the field of the sociology of literature. After surveying a number of the classic problems of the field, the course focuses on several sociological theories of the emergence and development of the novel. In addition to reading theorists such as Benedict Anderson, Pierre Bourdieu, Wendy Griswold, Michael McKeon, and Ian Watt, among others, there is a sociological reading of several classic novels (for example, by Cervantes, Defoe, Austen, and Flaubert, among others). Eastwood. Spring 2007 and alternate years

Sociology 334 (History 334) (3) ‑ Nationalism in Latin America. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101, Sociology 102, or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on the emergence and development of nationalism in Latin America. Readings include works by scholars from across the range of the social sciences, including history, political science, and sociology. The course devotes consideration to the following issues: a variety of explanatory accounts that scholars have provided of why the region turned to nationalism in the early 19th century; the main social and political implications of this transformation of identity; the various competing images of the nation in the region; the question of whether some Latin American nations understand themselves in "civic" and others in "ethnic" terms; the relationship between particularistic Latin American nationalisms and Bolívar's pan‑American dream; and, finally, the nature and roles of nationalism in more recent Latin American politics. Background knowledge of Latin American history is not required. Eastwood. Winter

Theater 290 (3) - Topics in Performing Arts. Prerequisite: Three credits in theater or permission of the instructor.  Selected studies in theater, film or dance with a focus on history, criticism, performance or production.  May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different. (GE4) Staff.    Spring 2006, and when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.

Course Revisions

Anthropology 390 - Historic Landscapes: Assessment, Conservation, and Interpretation
- offered at 6 credits (rather than 3) for spring 2006 only.

Art 160 (3) - Photography I. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to the technical and aesthetic principles of black-and-white photography as a fine art medium, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and darkroom technique. Lab fee and 35mm SLR film camera required. (GE4) Bowden. Fall, Winter

Art 161 (3) - Photography II. Prerequisite: Art 160 or permission of instructor. A continuation of Art 160, with an emphasis on theory, technique, creative problem solving, and the art of the critique. Lab fee and 35mm film SLR camera required (GE4). Bowden. Fall

Art 261 (3) - History of Photography. An introduction to the technical, aesthetic, and social history of photography within a cultural context in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as contemporary movements in the medium. Course includes weekly lectures, readings, films, and discussions, as well as several gallery and museum visits throughout the term.  Bowden. Winter 2008 and alternate years

Art 290 (3) - Special Topics in Photography. Prerequisite: Art 160 or permission of instructor. Advanced study in photography, with an emphasis on a specialized topic within the medium. Examples of topics may include Color Photography, Alternative Processes, Photographic Study in New York, or Digital Printmaking. Lab fee required. (GE4) Bowden. Spring

Business Administration 390, 391 (3-3 or 3,3) - Supervised Study Abroad.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, other prerequisites as specified by the instructor, and approval of the International Education Committee. These upper-level courses cover topics of current interest in business administration for which international travel provides a unique opportunity for enhancing understanding. Emphasis changes from year to year and is announced well in advance of registration. Only Business Administration 390 may be used for credit in the Business Administration major. When these courses are linked, Business Administration 391 must be completed satisfactorily to receive any credit for Business Administration 390. Staff. Spring (when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit)

Biology 230 (4) Field Botany to Field Biogeography and Species Conservation - new description above
Chemistry 341 (3) - Biochemistry - from four credits to three credits
Chemistry 343 (1) - Biochemistry I Laboratory - revised title

French 274 (3) - Cinéma français et francophone: 1980‑2000. Prerequisite: French 261 or equivalent or permission of instructor. An introduction to the study of film in French. Students familiarize themselves with the vocabulary and analytical tools necessary to analyze, discuss films and write about them. This course shows how film language has evolved since the New Wave of the 1960s through the critical study of selected films, representative of some of the major trends of the French and Francophone cinema production of the 1980‑2000 period. Viewings, presentations, discussions, and papers in French for development of communication skills. (HL, GE3) Frégnac‑Clave

History 103 (3) - China: Origins to 20th-Century Reforms. China's history embodies the full range of experience - as domain of imperial dynasties, target of imperialist aggression, dissident member of the cold-war Communist bloc, and current regional superpower in East Asia. This course tracks these transitions in political and social organization that, among other things, terminated history's longest- lasting monarchical system, ignited two of its largest revolutions, began World War II, and produced the most populous nation on earth. A wide range of cultural, political, and intellectual stereotypes of China are challenged in the process of exploring its particular historical experience. (HU, GE4) Bello. Fall 2008 and alternate years

History 131 (3) - Modern Latin America. Surveys the history of Latin American nations from independence to the present. Covers social, cultural, economic, and political history in diverse countries and regions. Topics include nation‑state formation, export economies, liberalism and neoliberalism, gender relations, race and ethnic divisions, science and technology, labor movements, popular culture, military dictatorships, civil wars, environmental change, and globalization. (HU, GE4) Carey . Winter

Interdepartmental 231 (1),
 and Interdepartmental 431 (1):  
To be offered on a pass/fail only basis.
Interdepartmental 341 (3) - Medical Ethics  Now GE4D and cross-listed with Philosophy 341
Interdepartmental 342 (3)—Legal Ethics  Now GE4D and cross-listed with Philosophy 342

Journalism 242 (3), Media Ownership and Control: Change in course number from 340
renumbered

Religion 310 (3), Perspectives on Death and Dying
as Religion 213 (3), Perspectives on Death and Dying
 

University Scholars 201A (3) - Humanities Seminar: Film Adaptation-Theory and Practice. Approved General Education designation for Fall, 2006 (GE3)
University Scholars 201B (3) - Humanities Seminar: Modern European Theater and Politics. Approved General Education designation for Fall, 2006(GE3)
University Scholars 201 (3) - Humanities Seminar: Vaux-le-Vicomte and Versailles. Approved General Education designation for credits but not toward meeting the requirement for two areas  (GE4)

Course Deletions

Biology 225S (6), Plant Function and Diversity: St. Andrews
Chemistry 107 (3) Chemistry in the Marketplace
Chemistry 125 (3) Chemistry on the Surface
Computer Science (3) C++ and UNIX Programming
Computer Science (3) Management Information Systems
(BUS 310 remains in the curriculum)
History 152 (3), Seminar in American Foreign Relations for Freshmen and Sophomores
History 349 (3), The United States Since 1945
History 351 (3), U.S. Social and Intellectual History from Colonial Times into the 19th Century
History 352 (3), U.S. Social and Intellectual History from the 19th Century
History 355 (3), The History of American Foreign and Military Affairs to 1913
History 356 (3), The History of American Foreign and Military Affairs, 1913-1975
History 368 (3), Seminar in the History of American Business
History 382 (3), Occupied Japan, 1945-1952
History 384 (3), History of Chinese Communism

Journalism 152 (1) Photojournalism
Physical Education 152, Football
Physical Education 157, Lacrosse

Politics 223 (3), The Commonwealth of Independent States

Religion 115 (3), Religion and Responsibility
Religion 116 (3), Religions of China and Japan
Religion 130 (3), Religions of India
Religion 218 (3), Comparative Religious Ethics
Religion 255 (3), Contemporary Christian Theology and Ethics
Religion 310 (3) renumbered to Religion 213 (3)
Religion 431 (1), Senior Thesis Preparation

Revisions to Degree, Major and Program Requirements

Biology
The majors leading to both the BA and BS degree are also revised as follows:
"Molecules and Cells: Biology 215* or 215S*, 310*, 320, 321*, 350..."

Business Administration
Revise the requirements for the major as follows: 
"4.a.     International Business: Accounting 396, Business Administration 305, 357, 359, 364, 390, Economics 280, 370, 371..."

Classics
The major requirements are also revised to read as follows. 
"2.        At least 12 additional credits chosen from the following: Classics; Greek; History 109, 110, 111; Latin; Philosophy 141, 222; Politics 265; Religion 102. Independent‑study courses must be approved in advance by the department."

Dance
Approved adding "DANC" as a disciplinary abbreviation for dance courses within the Theater department.

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Revised the major requirements as follows:
"3.c.   History of Ideas: History 306, 327; Philosophy 221 (Classics 221), 222; Religion 151, 215, 250..."

Religion
R
evised the requirements for the major as follows: 
"A major in religion leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 36 credits in religion as follows.
3.         Religious Traditions: five additional courses chosen from the following, with at least two in each of two areas and one in the third area:
a.   Asian Religions‑Religion  131, 132, 231, 340; 195, 295, or 395 when appropriate
b.   Christianity‑Religion 151, 152, 250, 252, 260, 350; 195, 295, or 395 when appropriate
c.   Islam, Judaism, American-Indian Religions‑Religion 105, 224 (Anthropology 224), 271, 272 (Literature in Translation 272), 275, 280, 281, 285 (Anthropology 285), 370; 195, 295, or 395 when appropriate

4.         Methods and Issues in Religious Studies: at least one course chosen from among Religion 110, 200 (Sociology 200), 203, 212 (Philosophy 212), 213, 215, 216, 221 (Sociology 221), and 296"

Shepherd Program for the Interdisciplinary Study of Poverty and Human Capability
Revised program requirements as follows:
2. At least 10 credits chosen from among the following: Economics 205, 280, English 260, Interdepartmental 102, Journalism 240, Philosophy 215, Politics 215, Poverty and Human Capability Studies 102, 295, ..."

Theater
Approved adding "DANC" as a disciplinary abbreviation for dance courses.

Revise the major in theater as follows: 
"3.        At least 15 credits chosen from among the following: Theater 202, 215, 216, 220, 232, 236, 237, 238, 239, 241, 250, 290, 362, 397, 423, 453"
..."

Policy information:     New    Deletions    Revisions

New

The Spring Option

Spring Term (page 70, replaces first sentence)
Beginning with Spring 2008, full-time enrollment in Spring term will require six credits of course work or the equivalent. Students enrolled for spring term must register for at least six credits; however, in spring term only students may petition for a three-credit course load provided they meet the faculty's goal for full engagement in approved educational activity. Such activities may include internships, community service, or service-learning projects. Any such alternative activity must be approved in advance by the associate deans of the College and the associate dean of the Williams School. Students must provide documentation describing the alternative educational activity, including certification by someone supervising the activity, that the commitment to the activity is equivalent to that of a three-credit course. Students may also exercise the Spring Option (see page xxx).

THE SPRING OPTION (page 70, before ACADEMIC ADVISING)
The Spring Option allows students to use the Spring Term of their sophomore, junior and/or senior years to engage in an internship, service program, employment, travel or educational program that will broaden and enhance their collegiate education. The faculty offer this opportunity to encourage students to seek creative outlets not provided in the normal academic setting.

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may spend one or more of their spring terms off campus engaged in other activities such as study at another institution (domestic or abroad), internships, employment, service opportunities, or travel. Seniors taking advantage of the Spring Option must have completed all requirements for graduation and are expected to return for commencement. Unlike a Leave of Absence for fall or winter terms, the Spring Option does not require petition to the Committee on the Automatic Rule and Reinstatement. Notification of a student's intent to spend a spring term off campus under this option must be made on a form available (to be created) and submitted by a date to be announced. The form will be reviewed and approved by the associate deans of the College and the associate dean of the Williams School. Students exercising the Spring Option must still register for fall classes on the normal schedule.

Students competing on an intercollegiate team for which the season or playoff period extends into the Spring term must be registered full-time for courses during the Spring term."

Freshman Seminars
Implementation of a pilot series of freshman seminars. The definition of "seminar" will for the moment remain a "big umbrella" with the primary determinations of size (limit 15), style (discussion vs. lecture), and activities designed to engage the student actively (readings vs. rote, projects vs. tests). In the initial effort, existing freshman-level courses will retain their course numbers in order to facilitate tracking for requirements and for repeats. New courses (either topics or tailoring upper-level courses for freshmen) will have a number assigned in the 180s. The following were discussed individually and approved, including general-education designations.

Art 121 (3) ‑ FS: Drawing I (GE4a) Beavers
Art 180 (3) ‑ FS: The Silk Road: Connecting East and West (GE4a) O'Mara
Classics 180 (3) ‑ FS: The Moral World of Antiquity (GE4c) Carras
Classics 204 (Literature in Translation 204) (3) ‑ FS: Augustan Rome (GE3) Carlisle
English 180 (3) ‑ FS: Laughing at Love: Shakespeare's Comedies (GE3) Dobin
Geology 100 (4) ‑ FS: General Geology with Field Emphasis (GE5a) Knapp
History 180 (3) ‑ FS: Natural Disasters in the Americas (GE4b) Carey
Journalism 180 (3) ‑ FS: Religion, Culture, and the Global Media. (GE4 as credit but not for areas) Abah
Music 180 (3) ‑ FS: The Voice: Sound and Science (GE4a) Myers
Philosophy 195A (3) ‑ FS: The Concept of Honor for Freshmen (GE4c) Sessions

Intercollegiate Athletics (page 85)
#3 "No athletic contests shall be scheduled for two days prior to the beginning of, or during, examinations, and contests scheduled away from Lexington during the first three days of the week prior to the beginning of examinations shall be held within a one-hour drive of campus. Athletic practices may be scheduled for not more than ninety minutes on the two days prior to the examination period.  In addition, during the winter examination period, practices may be scheduled on Wednesday and Thursday from 5:30 - 7:00 p.m.  Student-athletes who have an academic concern will be excused and this absence will not prejudice the coaches in the selection of team participants for competition."

Deletions

Revisions

Residency requirement (page 59)
Washington
and Lee will confer a degree only upon completion of a minimum of six terms of resident study as a full-time student.

Unsuccessful degree candidates (page 60, following Residency Requirement)
The Committee may also make exceptions to this rule to permit unsuccessful degree candidates to complete their degree requirements by taking no more than two term courses at another approved institution and by counting those grades in their cumulative average at Washington and Lee. Courses taken under such an exception during summer school are still subject to the restrictions listed on page 80 under "Summer School Credit."

Comprehensive Examinations (page 74-75)
A student receiving a failing grade must retake and pass the comprehensive examination before being permitted to complete the major.

Declaration and Change of Major (pages 71-72)
    Once a major or program is declared, it must be completed or removed prior to graduation.

    After January 15 of the senior year, students may not change their declared degree(s), major(s) or program(s) except with permission of the Faculty Executive Committee. An approved addition after the January 15 senior-year deadline incurs a $100 fee.  An approved addition after May 1 incurs a $250 fee, in addition to any required diploma replacement charge.  For December graduands the deadlines are September 15 and December 1, respectively.

Degree Application Deadline (page 60)
"Applications for degrees must be filed with the University Registrar on or before June 1, if the degree is to be taken in December, and on or before September 15, if the degree is to be taken in June."

Examinations (new wording in italics)
#5, page 74
"
Any student may change the time scheduled for a final examination with the advance approval of the professor concerned. To schedule a final examination outside of the examination period approved by the faculty, a student must petition the Faculty Executive Committee and have secured permission of the professor concerned."

New Course Block Schedule to begin Fall, 2006
A   8:00 - 8:55
B   9:05 - 10:00
C   10:10 - 11:05
D   11:15 - 12:10
E   12:20 - 1:15
F   1:25 - 2:20
G   2:30 - 3:25
H   3:35 - 4:30
I   4:40 - 5:35

Concerning the 3-out-of-4 spring terms issue:
"The University should make every effort to make it possible for students, if they so choose, to attend all four spring terms of their college career. A full review will be conducted after a three‑year period to evaluate whether the efforts undertaken have succeeded so that sufficient courses and seats are available to students who elect to remain on campus each spring term. Any policy changes that require faculty action will be brought to the faculty for a vote."

Implementation of the new 115-credit requirement
"Students who are required to accumulate at least 121 credits for completion of degree requirements must declare using a catalogue in effect while they are students and no later than the 2005-06 catalogue. Students who are required to accumulate at least 115 credits for completion of degree requirements must declare using a catalogue in effect while they are students and no earlier than the 2006-07 catalogue."

Implementation of the new general education requirements
"Students entering W&L initially in the fall of 2007 will be required to fulfill the new general education requirements. Students entering earlier will be held to the old requirements."

Modifications to the following undergraduate adjusted class schedules to incorporate the new course block schedule

Founders' Day / Omicron Delta Kappa (January) Convocation
Schedule of Classes
A - 8:00 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
B - 8:55 a.m. - 9:40 a.m.
C - 9:50 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
D - 10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
CONVOCATION - 11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
E - 1:10 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
F - 2:05 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
G - 3:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
H - 3:55 p.m. - 4:40 p.m.
I - 4:50 p.m. - 5:35 p.m.

Phi Beta Kappa/Society of the Cincinnati (March) Convocation
Schedule of Classes
A - 8:00 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
B - 8:55 a.m. - 9:40 a.m.
C - 9:50 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
D - 10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
CONVOCATION - 11:40 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
E - 1:10 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
F - 2:05 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
G - 3:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
H - 3:55 p.m. - 4:40 p.m.
I - 4:50 p.m. - 5:35 p.m.

INCLEMENT WEATHER ADJUSTMENT
Undergraduate Schedule of Classes beginning at 10 a.m.
A - 10:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.
B - 10:50 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
C - 11:40 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.
D - 12:30 p.m. - 1:10 p.m.
E - 1:20 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
F - 2:10 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
G - 3:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.
H - 3:50 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
I - 4:40 p.m. - 5:20 p.m.

Final Examinations policy (page 73) to include the following sentence (italicized below):
A1. Final examinations are given at the end of each term in a period approved in advance by the faculty. End-of-term examinations that cover a substantial portion of the term's work and that count as a significant percentage of the term grade shall be given only during the final examination period. Examinations are given on each scheduled weekday and...”

Miscellaneous information:

New General Education Requirements: For the 2007-2008 catalogue

"Foundation and Distribution Requirements."

Foundation: complete all four areas

FW       Writing                                                   competency or 1 course
FL        Language                                                competency or 1 to 4 course(s)
FM       Mathematics & Computer Science           1 course minimum 3 credits
FP        Physical Education                                  4 skills (1 credit) & swimming test

Distribution:

Humanities: complete four courses, at least one from each of the following three areas
HA       Arts (art, music, theater, creative writing)                               minimum 3 credits
HL       Literature (in any language)                                                   1 course minimum 3 credits
HU       Humanities (history, philosophy, religion, interdisciplinary)        1 course minimum 3 credits

Sciences and Social Sciences: complete four courses

SL        Laboratory                                                                               1 course minimum 3 credits
SC        Additional science, mathematics, computer science                     1 course minimum 3 credits
SS        Social Science (anthropology, economics, politics, psychology,
            sociology, interdisciplinary)                                                         2 courses, one from each of 2 areas